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The Editors Cut

Episode 093 –  EditCon 2023: Down at Fraggle Rock

Episode 93: EditCon 2023: Down at Fraggle Rock

Episode 093 - EditCon 2023: Down at Fraggle Rock

An international hit in the 80s and beloved for many viewers to this day, FRAGGLE ROCK comes back more colorful, high-energy and furrier than before.

In this episode Paul Winestock, CCE, Duncan Christie, CCE and Marianna Khoury with Paul Ackerley discuss their experiences and work process in the edit suite on this reboot for both the young and young at heart.

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The Editor’s Cut – Episode 030 – “What is Anti-Oppression? With Tenniel Brown”

Sarah Taylor [00:00:01]

Hello and welcome to The Editor’s Cut. I’m your host Sarah Taylor. At the CCE, we began our journey of self education with Anti-Oppression training in 2019. It was invaluable for us as it provided us with tools to assess how we as an organization could set a course of action to root our unconscious and systematic bias in our operations. This training is now a permanent part of our budget so future board members and volunteers can continue this work, and equity can be part of the fabric of our organization. We are offering a Lunch and Learn Introduction To Anti Oppressive Communication with Tenniel Brown on July 27. Today I’m lucky to be able to sit down with Tenniel Brown and discuss what Anti-Oppressive training is and what we can expect from this webinar. Tenniel Brown is a passionate anti-racist anti oppression and mental health speaker dedicated to improving the experiences of marginalized people in all institutional settings. She is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication which specializes in providing anti oppressive, trauma-informed counseling, clinical supervision and organizational consulting, as well as customized workshops training and team retreats. I’m joined with Tenniel Brown, she is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication based in Toronto. And we just want to have a little conversation about why anti oppression work is important in this and all days but specifically right now. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background and why you started the Center For Anti-Oppressive Communication.

Tenniel Brown [00:01:41]

My background is as a psychotherapist. So I spent I’ve spent many many years working with individuals and couples and families and groups helping them to access more of their well-being by addressing different mental health issues specifically trauma. One of the things that I specialize in addressing is racialized trauma. But also trauma that comes from folks that have experienced different types of oppression. And I think for most people that are called to this type of work it’s quite personal for me right. So often when you don’t see the work that you know needs to happen in the community taking place you create it. And so that was me. You know I think I saw that there was a need for organizations to have somebody come in and not just talk about diversity inclusion but talk about what happens when certain identities have power and that unbalance of power and how to actually address that in our communication. I knew that out in the community there were therapists and social workers that were wanting to do better work. You know work in the best practice way with clients that are black, racialized, queer, and trans, and had nowhere to go to get supervision and support. And finally I knew personally that there were so many folks that when they were ready to do therapy work they needed to see someone sitting across the office that looked like them or had a very similar lived experience and they just were not going to come unless that was the case. So all these things I knew was happening and nobody was doing it. And I said someone’s got to do something and that was me. I think what needs to come out of what’s happened in June is for folks to see black professionals and black community in in the in sort of like the the brilliance of what we do and it’s not uncommon that in many cases where we don’t see ourselves we create it. So yeah that was the spirit of and I think that when I started the organization I knew that it was important for there to be a place where folks from those different backgrounds could come and get that support and information. So it’s a real passion of mine. It is my baby and it’s so beautiful to see folks wanting this information during this time.

Sarah Taylor [00:04:01]

Yeah so important. Can you tell us what Anti-Oppression means and what someone can expect by taking an anti oppressive workshop?

Tenniel Brown [00:04:10]

Sure absolutely. So when you sort of break down the word anti oppression anti oppressive practice we take a look at that anti part and essentially that that just means opposition to oppression and then the practice part. So AOP… the practice part pertains to the context in which you are practicing opposition to oppression. So you can apply an anti oppressive lens to just about anything. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with organizations like Pride Toronto and work with your curators to apply an anti-oppressive lens to the way they do event organizing. I have applied an anti oppressive lens to the way I do therapy and clinical supervision with other therapists. You can apply an anti oppressive lens to teaching. You can apply it to student advising, you can apply it to just about anything. I’ve been working with fitness professionals looking at applying an anti oppressive lens to the way that they support folks that are on their fitness journey. So so it’s about looking at whatever practice whatever context you are working in and using that platform to be able to oppose oppression and all of its forms. So that’s essentially what it is.

Sarah Taylor [00:05:29]

And so when someone takes courses like anti oppressive communication course or participates in your courses what can they expect to be talking about or learning?

Tenniel Brown [00:05:37]

Absolutely so I think one of the most important things is to sort of pull back a little bit of you know the cover on this because I think anti oppressive language is its own language. It’s like Spanish. And you see so many people getting themselves into some rather serious trouble these days because they actually don’t know the language they don’t understand… in some ways the harm of some of the things that they’re doing and saying the deep harm of that. You get a lot of people who don’t really know how to talk about these issues. And so you go into a shame spiral and you just don’t talk. You just get very quiet and I always argue that you know the silence piece is a part of how we got ourselves into this trouble as a human society in the first place. So what I offer is something for everybody. I think over the years what folks have said to me is is even somebody who’s maybe got a social work background and knows about anti oppressive practice when they come to one of my trainings they find that they are moved further along in their application of that perspective around “OK, well what does this mean when I’m interacting with somebody right here in a one on one context.” Other people that are completely brand new have never had the chance to learn any of this language or understand any of these concepts have said over the years that they felt like they left with a really good sense of what this topic is. But not just that practical skills. I’m all about practical skills. I want to offer things that folks can use tomorrow today and the next day and my mission is also for folks to leave his training and talk about it. Tell a friend, tell a colleague, tell a family member, and feel equipped to be able to engage in these conversations. So when someone is saying or doing something problematic, you have this confidence in the skills to be able to interpret what’s going on there and to be able to talk to them and to be able to address it. The other thing that I do is I couch everything that I do in my trainings in a self care and team care perspective. And I think this is very important. We have to look after our emotions. We have to look after ourselves and we have to look after each other. I always say you could be as anti oppressive as you want but if you haven’t had any lunch… if you haven’t eaten anything… you’re not good.

Sarah Taylor [00:07:57]

You’ve got the hangries!

Tenniel Brown [00:07:59]

Trust me, Anti-Oppressive work requires patience. It requires empathy. It requires compassion and self compassion. You will fall down a lot and I find you know and I talk a lot about cancel culture and don’t get me wrong really that could be its own podcast.

Sarah Taylor [00:08:19]

Totally. Especially in this industry.

Tenniel Brown [00:08:22]

Look we need to talk about this and I get why certain people are being canceled for sure. And yet as someone who does this work I recognize that I’m so thankful I wasn’t canceled because over the years I’ve done and said things before I knew before I took a course like this before I had an opportunity to learn what was problematic about my lens. I’m so thankful that I was able to make those mistakes in a safe environment and actually benefit from that and grow. So people get a safe environment to learn language and understand what is going on, what is oppression, if oppression is so bad why don’t we just stop this. Well I unpack that for folks. Why is this so complicated and why doesn’t this just stop. And then I provide practical skills for folks to be able to apply this to their lives and their communication. I think the other thing that I think folks get is not just sort of a general whatever, you’ll find that I’m really interested in applying it to film editors and what it is that you do on a regular basis and looking at how you can use your platform to be able to actually oppose oppression.

Sarah Taylor [00:09:31]

Yeah well it’s like it’s huge I know for myself we did anti oppression workshop as a board for the CCE. I’m in an interracial marriage and so I thought “Oh I know a lot.” Like I’ve been unpacking this stuff for a while and understanding in my own way. But also like kind of like how do I say it to my white uncle who is racist like how do I approach that. And by taking that one course, like you said I got so much more understanding of where people might come from and the language and I could approach it not by just being angry because anytime I’d hear anything I was like “You’re talking about my husband, you’re talking about my child! This is not OK!” And so it made a huge impact on me and I felt like I kind of knew some stuff but I realized that there was so much more to learn. And I think I’m still learning and it’s opened up even conversations I’ve had with my husband and my in-laws… and so I think people who are in my situation are like “no I’m cool I got I’m married to so-and-so or I have my best friend or whatever.” You grew up in your lens and there’s way more to learn and unpack.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:41]

Absolutely. Absolutely it’s so true. And I always say that absolutely positively nobody gets a pass on this.

Sarah Taylor [00:10:48]

100 percent.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:49]

At all. You know myself as someone who identifies as a black fem queer woman, you know folks would be like well you know you of course you couldn’t oppress. And it’s like yes we are all susceptible to experiencing oppression and we are all oppressors. So I have aspects of my identity that allow me to have privilege. And the thing about this is that if you’re not aware of those things that’s how you harm people that’s how you engage in micro aggressions. You know what I mean? That’s how you you know get striking up a conversation with someone about your latest renovation in your house when this person is still renting and doesn’t even have access. These are the types of things that you’re never protected from. Right. Like you’re not protected from that in a certain way. So it’s really important to remember that.

Sarah Taylor [00:11:40]

Where should someone start if they’re like feeling overwhelmed they’re like wow I know that I need to make this change. I’ve seen all this information now on social media and I’m saying all the wrong things and like you said I’m just going to be quiet which is not the right thing to do. So where do they go and what should they focus on first to just like get into this mindset of making these changes?

Tenniel Brown [00:12:02]

That’s a great question. And what I would say is education. Not a coincidence right? So of course you know joining with you know your organization to offer this to the community because I think that’s step number one. I think we do need to have good information about… you need to educate yourself. I would say that it’s a really important first step to really listen, and I find even when you have more information and you have more training it even improves the way that you can listen because what you find is when you don’t have that knowledge there’s certain things that are sort of prevent you from even being open. So I find the training and the skills and the confidence that you get from doing the course like this allows you to even listen deeper right and understand more and I think that that’s step number one. I think that once… but don’t stay there! Because I think a lot of people oh I’m listening but really it’s just their guilt and shame. So yeah they’re still not doing anything but once you’ve had the chance to listen you now can start thinking more about your platform and I think that’s one of the most important thing for your listeners to know that if it’s like well I’m not a social worker I’m not a therapist what’s this got to do with me it’s like it has everything to do with you. You have a platform as a film editor and it’s important for you to acknowledge that there are big ways and small ways that you can make a difference. And we all have a responsibility. What’s happened in this world since COVID what’s happened in this world since June is we can no longer close our eyes to this. We have to look at this and all the years that we have stayed silent on this has been what’s caused the problem. So the reality is is that we all are called to use our platform to be able to address this to look around the room and be like who isn’t here? To look around your history of the films that you and different projects you’ve been involved in and being like how many of these people, how many of these stories featured stories that were outside of what we usually see? Right. And looking at the ways that you can use your platform and your influence to be able to make a change, so we’re all called to do that I don’t care if you’re a child care worker or a housekeeper do some working at a gas station, it literally doesn’t matter we’re all a part of this human society. We all have some sort of platform and so we all have a responsibility to do something. You know Sarah one of my favorite slogans that’s come out of the protest is “Silence is Violence.” I love that one because I know what happens when people don’t have education and knowledge. They go into a shame cycle they go into a guilt cycle and they go into fear and you know what happens there? Shh. And you know what, that doesn’t help anybody at all. So I recognize that these are difficult things for us to unpack but we all have a responsibility to use whatever platform we have to make a difference. So starting by educating yourself, listening a lot, and then that’s going to help you to be more open to what you can do. And then looking at your platform whether that be personal or professional to make a change.

Sarah Taylor [00:15:20]

That was perfect. Yeah. That’s huge. And even since I took my training and even just since I’ve done my own inner work I noticed like I wouldn’t pick certain shots anymore or there’ll be things in my edit where I’m like “that’s a stereotype” or “No that’s not going to work. We can’t do that we can’t have that.” And so I think if everybody’s doing that then what we’re seeing on screen can start changing.

Tenniel Brown [00:15:45]

Absolutely. Absolutely and there’s these you know there’s there’s big ways and then there’s little ways like you describe. So it’s it is about really curating your lens, right and making sure that you’re seeing more and I think training like this just helps you to really open up your lens. So you’re not just seeing directly what’s in front of you work to the side of you but it’s more of like a panoramic view which you folks really need in the work that you do.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:09]

100 percent. Yeah. Well I hope that our membership joins us. I know we’ve already been getting people RSVPing which is very exciting. On July 27 2020 to learn and to unpack and to take part and just hopefully we can continue to do stuff with you and just keep educating and making the changes we can make.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:28]

Yeah. Join us. Join us. Don’t hesitate folks. Be a part of this. I’m really looking forward to working with everybody. And you know what we’re gonna have fun. I know these topics are really heavy but we’re gonna have some fun and we’re really going to connect with each other as a community so I look forward to meeting everybody at this training.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:46]

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me today and I look forward to seeing you on the 27th and continuing my journey. So thank you for doing this for us and thank you for sharing your knowledge and your experience with the world. So thank you so much.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:59]

You’re so welcome. Thanks for having me.

Sarah Taylor [00:17:03]

Thank you so much for joining us today. And a big thank you goes to Tenniel Brown and a special thanks to Maureen Grant and Jane MacRae. If you’d like to connect with Tenniel, you can find her on Instagram @TennielBrown. If you’d like to bring Tenniel into your organization to learn more about anti oppressive work, you can check out her website at brownconsulting.com. I look forward to learning more from Tenniel on July 27 2020 at the CCE Lunch and Learn I hope to see you there. The CCE has been supporting BIPOC TV and FILM. BIPOC TV and FILM is a grassroots organization and collective of black, indigenous, and people of colour in Canada’s TV and film industry. From writers, directors, producers, and actors, to editors, crew members, and executives. Their members are a mix of emerging, mid-level, and established industry professionals. BIPOC TV and FILM is dedicated to increasing the representation of BIPOC both in front and behind the camera. If you would like to donate to BIPOC TV and FILM please head to their website at bipoctvandfilm.com. The CCE is taking steps to build a more equitable ecosystem within our industry and we encourage our members to participate in any way they can. 

The main title sound design was created by Jane Tattersall. Additional ADR recording by Andrea Rusch. Original music provided by Chad Blain. This episode was mixed and mastered by Tony Bao. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and tell your friends to tune in. Til next time I’m your host Sarah Taylor.

Outtro

The CCE is a non-profit organization with the goal of bettering the art and science of picture editing. If you wish to become a CCE member please visit our website www.cceditors.ca. Join our great community of Canadian editors for more related info.

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Credits

A special thanks goes to

Alison Dowler

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE

Hosted and Produced by

Sarah Taylor

Main Title Sound Design by

Jane Tattersall

ADR Recording by

Andrea Rusch

Mixed and Mastered by

Tony Bao

Original Music by

Chad Blain

Sponsor Narration by

Paul Winestock

Sponsored by

DGC Alberta

Categories
Press Release

2024 CCE Award Nominees

2024 CCE Award Nominees

The Canadian Cinema Editors is thrilled to announce the nominees for the 2024 CCE Awards. Join us on Friday, June 14th, 2024 for an evening celebrating excellence in editing at the Delta Hotel in Toronto with our host Elvira Kurt.

Ticket sales will open this Friday! Congratulations to all our nominees!

Best Editing in an Animated Pre-School Series
Sponsored by: Canadian Cinema Editors

Gavin Ebedes & Ryan Mohammed – RUBBLE & CREW: Ep 120 – THE CREW & CHASE ARE ON THE CASE
Paul Hunter, CCE & Katie Tomchishen – NATURE CAT: Ep 508 – A LITTLE KELP FROM MY FRIENDS & MISSION TO MARS
Paul Hunter, CCE, Katie Tomchishen & Jason Pichonsky – SUPERBUNS: Ep 116 – C’MON CATERPILLAR
Rachel Guergis, Bec Cranswick, Sophia Loffreda & Dean Hannas – SPIDEY AND HIS AMAZING FRIENDS: Ep 224 – STOLEN WEB-QUARTERS/SPIDEYS IN SPACE!

Best Editing in Animation
Sponsored by: Annex Pro

Greg Canning, Max Szentveri, Nicholas Shepard, Ryan Jobling & Leland Miller – THE SNOOPY SHOW: CHARLIE BROWN HITS A HOME RUN
Orion McCaw, Margaret Reid, Rob Smith, Matthew Innanen & Maddison Varas – SONIC PRIME: Ep 201 – AVOID THE VOID
Orion McCaw, Rob Smith & Matthew Innanen – STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE’S PERFECT HOLIDAY
Ryan L. Smith – LAKE ERIE
Yvann Thibaudeau, CCE – MIRACULOUS LADYBUG

Best Editing in Documentary Feature
Sponsored by: Purple Dog Post Production Services

Annie Leclair – GREYLAND
Eugene Weis – REVIVAL69: THE CONCERT THAT ROCKED THE WORLD
Greg Ng, CCE & Katie Chipperfield – I’M JUST HERE FOR THE RIOT
Ricardo Acosta, CCE & Mike Magidson – CHILDRENS OF LAS BRISAS
Xi Feng & Maxime Faure – CAITI BLUES

Best Editing in Documentary Short Form
Sponsored by: City of Toronto

Colin Waugh – ARTHUR ERICKSON’S DYDE HOUSE
Duncan Buchanan – THE LONG ROAD HOME
Jane MacRae – LOUD AND HERE
Kyle Gregory Sanderson – NINE EASY DANCES
Marie-Pier Dupuis – APRÈS-COUPS

Best Editing in Docu-series / Docu-drama / Factual
Sponsored by: Rolling Pictures

Andres Landau – THE NATURE OF THINGS: Ep 6210 – WAR FOR THE WOODS
Eamonn O’Connor, CCE – BLACK LIFE: UNTOLD STORIES: Ep 102 – REVOLUTION REMIX
Hart Snider – GRIZZLY REWILD: Ep 6208
Steven Budd – DARK SIDE OF COMEDY: Ep 201 – ROBIN WILLIAMS
Swapna Mella, CCE – STUFF THE BRITISH STOLE: Ep 101 – THE JEWEL OF DENIAL

Best Editing in a Live Action Family Series or MOW
Sponsored by: IATSE 891

Courtney Goldman & Nathan Martinak – JANE: Ep 101 – URSUS MARITIMUS
Fabiola Caraza – THE POPULARITY PAPERS: Ep 108 – GHOST MORTEM
Gordon Rempel, CCE – MONSTER HIGH 2
Thomas Lieu – THE HARDY BOYS: Ep 302 – A VANISHING ACT
Vesna Svilanovic, CCE – RUBY AND THE WELL: Ep 302 – I WISH I COULD STOP THIS MONSTER

Best Editing in Feature Film
Sponsored by: Coma Edits

Jorge Weisz, CCE – SWEETLAND
Justin Oakey – THE KING TIDE
Marie-Pier Dupuis, Dominique Fortin & Maxim Rheault – SOLO
Orlee Buium – NORTH OF NORMAL
Yvann Thibaudeau CCE – DIS MOI POURQUOI CES CHOSES SONT SI BELLES

Best Editing in MOW / Mini-Series
Sponsored by: DGC National

Christopher Donaldson, CCE – FELLOW TRAVELERS: Ep101 – YOU’RE WONDERFUL
Louis-Philippe Rathé – DÉSOBÉIR – LE CHOIX DE CHANTALE DAIGLE: Ep 106 – LA SEULE PERSONNE À POUVOIR CHOISIR, C’EST MOI
Maxime Lahaie – LITTLE BIRD: Ep 104 – BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE
Myriam Coulombe – DÉSOBÉIR – LE CHOIX DE CHANTALE DAIGLE: Ep 104 TU SAIS BEN QUE ÇA SERA JAMAIS FINI
Myriam Coulombe – MÉGANTIC: Ep 104 BRYAN

Best Editing in Lifestyle / Competition / Reality
Sponsored by: RTR Media

Guillaume Marin – DRAGS, REINES DE LA POP
Jeff Perry, Ryan Monteith, Curtis Rogers & Keisha Rose – BEST IN MINIATURE: Ep 208 – THE FINALE
Jonathan Dowler, CCE – CANADA’S DRAG RACE: Ep 405 – SNATCH GAME
Lindsay Ragone – CANADA’S DRAG RACE: Ep 407 – FROM DRAGS TO RICHES: THE RUSICAL
Samantha Shields – HOME TOWN: Ep 703 – NEW-STALGIC RESTORATION

Best Editing in a Short Film
Sponsored by: Meridian Artists

Amélie Labrèche – CHAT MORT
Anna Catley -THRIVING: A DISSOCIATED REVERIE
Christopher Malanchen – BORDERS
Graham Fortin – DEFINING HUMAN
Myriam Magassouba – FAIRE UN ENFANT

Best Editing in TV Comedy
Sponsored by: Vanguarde Management Artists

Charles Boisseau & David Bourbonnais – CLUB SOLY: Ep 301 – ART CONTEMPORAIN, CHAR ÉLECTRIQUE ET PUBS DE CHIPS
Drew MacLeod – LETTERKENNY: Ep 1206 – OVER AND OUT
Drew MacLeod – SHORESY: Ep 206 – ACCOUNTABILITY
Justin Li – LUCKY HANK: Ep 105 – THE CLOCK
Maureen Grant, CCE – SORT OF: Ep 306 – SORT OF HOSPITAL AGAI

Best Editing in TV Drama
Sponsored by: Take 5 Productions

David Di Francesco – VIRAGE: DOUBLE FAUTE: Ep 102 – PRÊT À TOUT
Jonathan Eagan – THE CHANGELING: Ep 107 – STORMY WEATHER
Geoff Ashenhurst, CCE & Hye Mee Na – THE CHANGELING: Ep 101 – FIRST COMES LOVE
Greg Ng, CCE, Roderick Deogrades, CCE & Maxime Lahaie – BONES OF CROWS: THE SERIES: Ep 102 – TO BE SEPERATED
Lisa Robison, CCE – FIREFLY LANE: Ep 213 – CAN’T FIGHT THAT FEELING

Best Editing in Web Series / Digital Content
Sponsored by: Canadian Cinema Editors

Ben Allan – LESS THAN KOSHER: Ep 101 – THE SYNAGOGUE VIV HASN’T BEEN TO IN 15 YEARS
David Valiquette – VIVRE AVEC LA POLLUTION DE LA FONDERIE HORNE
Jake Lee – STREAMS FLOW FROM A RIVER: Ep 4 – BENNY AND THE JETS
Jean-Philippe Gagnon – NICO SE PRIVE DE SOMMEIL PENDANT 7 NUITS
Milena Salazar – GOVERNOR GENERAL’S AWARDS IN VISUAL AND MEDIA ARTS: PORTRAIT OF SHANNON WALSH

Lifetime Achievement Award: Mary Stephen, CCE & Gordon McClellan, CCE
Sponsored by: Canadian Cinema Editors

Career Achievement Award: Don Thompson
Sponsored by: Canadian Cinema Editors

Student Award of Merit
Sponsored by: Insight Productions
Announcing in early May

Assistant Editor Recognition Award
Sponsored by: Matrx
Announcing in early May

Cocktail Hour
Sponsored by: DGC Ontario

With Thanks To Our Sponsors

Categories
Press Release

The Canadian Cinema Editors announces the recipients of the 2024 Lifetime Achievement Award and Career Achievement Award 

Lifetime Achievement and Career Achievement Award - 2024 Press Release

Toronto, April 8th, 2024 – The Canadian Cinema Editors (CCE) is pleased to announce that Mary Stephen, CCE and Gordon McClellan, CCE are the recipients of the 2024 Lifetime Achievement Award. Don Thompson is the recipient for the Career Achievement Award. The CCE will present these awards at the 14th Annual CCE Awards on June 14th, 2024 at the Delta Hotel in Toronto.

Our full list of CCE Award nominees will be announced on April 15! Please visit our website for more information.

Lifetime Achievement Award

Mary Stephen, CCE

Mary Stephen, CCE

Born in Hong Kong, Mary’s family immigrated to Montreal in the 1970s where she graduated from Concordia University. Mary has been living in Paris since the 1980s but navigates between her home in France and work commitments in Canada, Asia, Australia and Africa.

Mary was French New Wave master Eric Rohmer’s chief editor for more than 30 years, starting as assistant to his then-chief-editor Cécile Décugis. When Cécile retired, Mary edited Rohmer’s WINTER’S TALE up to his last feature THE ROMANCE OF ASTREA AND CELADON, and many shorts in-between, collaborating occasionally on the films’ music.

In the last 2 decades, Mary has also been editing, associate-producing and consulting with fiction and documentary filmmakers all over the world. Some of the directors she worked with include Tiffany Hsiung, Michka Säal and Lixin Fan in Canada, Seren Yüce and Hüseyin Karabey in Turkey, Nicole Shafer in South Africa, Du Haibin, Lina Yang in mainland China, and Adam Wong, Jessie Tsang, Amos Wong and Ann Hui in Hong Kong. Mary’s own directorial works include VISION FROM THE EDGE : BREYTEN BREYTENBACK PAINTING THE LINES and THE MEMORY OF WATER. She is currently at work on her new film PALIMPSEST : TRACES OF A NAME, a co-production between 4 countries.

Mary is very active in mentoring and nurturing young filmmakers in many labs and forums. She serves on film festival juries often and has been nominated for numerous editing awards. She is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and was named Chevalier in the Order of Letters and Arts by the French cultural minister in 2018. Last year, Mary was the 2nd recipient of the Fire Horse Award of the Reel Asian Film Festival in 2023.

Lifetime Achievement Award

Gordon Mcclellan, cce

Gordon McClellan, CCE

Gord McClellan, CCE has been a Picture Editor in Drama and Documentary for over 50 years. Films he has edited have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Cable ACE (the Cable TV award was later merged with the Emmys), a Gemini and other awards. His work has been seen on ABC, A&E, BBC, CBC, CBS, CTV, Discovery, Disney, Disney XD, Global, Great American Family, Hallmark, HBO, Netflix, NBC, Nickelodeon, Paramount, Showcase, Showtime, Sony, Superchannel, TVO, W and Warner Brother.

Gord edited film and video for two decades, very patiently filing frames of trimmed shots and dealing with multiple degrading generations of video edits. He gratefully leapt at the opportunity to work in non-linear when Lightworks and AVID arrived on the scene.

Highlights of his career include the first five seasons of THE FIFTH ESTATE, several docs with filmmaker John Zaritsky, notably the Oscar-winning, JUST ANOTHER MISSING KID and music documentary TEARS ARE NOT ENOUGH, featuring producer David Foster, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Brian Adams, Geddy Lee and Gordon Lightfoot among many others. TV Series include six seasons of ROAD TO AVONLEA, five Features, two Mini-Series and 31 TV Movies. His focus for the last few years has been Romantic Comedies, a genre he thoroughly enjoys.

Career Achievement Award

Don Thompson

Don Thompson is an experienced leader within the Media & Entertainment industry, known for utilizing his creative and technical skills in problem solving, talent development and networking and collaboration to accelerate growth.

With an entrepreneurial influence, he has helped found or inspire growth and change across a broad range of companies in Vancouver, Toronto and LA including Finale Post (now Picture Shop Vancouver), The Foundation Post (LA), Image Engine VFX (Vancouver), The Eyes Productions and Shooters Production Services (Vancouver & TO). His production experience includes work as an Editor, Post Supervisor, Producer/Director, and Videographer. Don’s creative credits include a wide range of feature, television, commercial, live sports and music, and cutting-edge documentary productions. 

He is actively involved in the production community in Vancouver as Chair of the Vancouver Post Alliance (VPA) and board member of both the Motion Picture Production Industry Association of BC (MPPIA) and the Leo Awards, and frequently travels to LA for industry relations and marketing and sales initiatives with the major studios, networks and production companies. Don is passionate about seeing Canada’s production and post production community reach its full potential, and looks forward to continuing to contribute to the success of its talent, crews, production companies and facilities in the years ahead.

About the Lifetime Achievement Award
This recognition is presented to an editor who has elevated the craft of picture editing, has contributed to the editing community and demonstrated a passion for editing.

About the Career Achievement Award
This recognition is presented to a member of the broader film community who has shown great support for Canadian editors and the editorial profession over the course of their career.

About the Canadian Cinema Editors (CCE)
The Canadian Cinema Editors (CCE) is a bilingual not-for-profit organization fuelled by the passion of its Canada-wide post-production membership. We are dedicated to meeting the needs of our growing member base through cultivating an environment of learning, community and inclusivity. Ultimately, we are here to showcase our world-class talents at the forefront of the Canadian Film Industry and internationally. Follow us on X (Twitter), Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram. www.cceditors.ca

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The Editors Cut

Episode 92 –  EditCon 2023: Shaping Memories

Episode 92: EditCon 2023: Shaping Memories

Episode 092 - EditCon 2023: Shaping Memories

Documentary has the power and versatility in exploring urgent social subject matters, yet it can also embrace an intimate first-person narrative, or even become an experimentation of cinematic craftsmanship.

In this episode we invited the editors from three critically acclaimed Canadian documentaries. Whether it’s the sensory and cinematic collaboration between a filmmaker and a naturalist on Sable Island (GEOGRAPHIES OF SOLITUDE), the eye-opening testimony from the Coloured Hockey League about the untold history of racism in ice hockey (BLACK ICE) or the heart-wrenching revisit of her older brother’s death in BACK HOME, each of these films was made with powerful bravery and is sublime in its own way.

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The Editor’s Cut – Episode 030 – “What is Anti-Oppression? With Tenniel Brown”

Sarah Taylor [00:00:01]

Hello and welcome to The Editor’s Cut. I’m your host Sarah Taylor. At the CCE, we began our journey of self education with Anti-Oppression training in 2019. It was invaluable for us as it provided us with tools to assess how we as an organization could set a course of action to root our unconscious and systematic bias in our operations. This training is now a permanent part of our budget so future board members and volunteers can continue this work, and equity can be part of the fabric of our organization. We are offering a Lunch and Learn Introduction To Anti Oppressive Communication with Tenniel Brown on July 27. Today I’m lucky to be able to sit down with Tenniel Brown and discuss what Anti-Oppressive training is and what we can expect from this webinar. Tenniel Brown is a passionate anti-racist anti oppression and mental health speaker dedicated to improving the experiences of marginalized people in all institutional settings. She is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication which specializes in providing anti oppressive, trauma-informed counseling, clinical supervision and organizational consulting, as well as customized workshops training and team retreats. I’m joined with Tenniel Brown, she is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication based in Toronto. And we just want to have a little conversation about why anti oppression work is important in this and all days but specifically right now. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background and why you started the Center For Anti-Oppressive Communication.

Tenniel Brown [00:01:41]

My background is as a psychotherapist. So I spent I’ve spent many many years working with individuals and couples and families and groups helping them to access more of their well-being by addressing different mental health issues specifically trauma. One of the things that I specialize in addressing is racialized trauma. But also trauma that comes from folks that have experienced different types of oppression. And I think for most people that are called to this type of work it’s quite personal for me right. So often when you don’t see the work that you know needs to happen in the community taking place you create it. And so that was me. You know I think I saw that there was a need for organizations to have somebody come in and not just talk about diversity inclusion but talk about what happens when certain identities have power and that unbalance of power and how to actually address that in our communication. I knew that out in the community there were therapists and social workers that were wanting to do better work. You know work in the best practice way with clients that are black, racialized, queer, and trans, and had nowhere to go to get supervision and support. And finally I knew personally that there were so many folks that when they were ready to do therapy work they needed to see someone sitting across the office that looked like them or had a very similar lived experience and they just were not going to come unless that was the case. So all these things I knew was happening and nobody was doing it. And I said someone’s got to do something and that was me. I think what needs to come out of what’s happened in June is for folks to see black professionals and black community in in the in sort of like the the brilliance of what we do and it’s not uncommon that in many cases where we don’t see ourselves we create it. So yeah that was the spirit of and I think that when I started the organization I knew that it was important for there to be a place where folks from those different backgrounds could come and get that support and information. So it’s a real passion of mine. It is my baby and it’s so beautiful to see folks wanting this information during this time.

Sarah Taylor [00:04:01]

Yeah so important. Can you tell us what Anti-Oppression means and what someone can expect by taking an anti oppressive workshop?

Tenniel Brown [00:04:10]

Sure absolutely. So when you sort of break down the word anti oppression anti oppressive practice we take a look at that anti part and essentially that that just means opposition to oppression and then the practice part. So AOP… the practice part pertains to the context in which you are practicing opposition to oppression. So you can apply an anti oppressive lens to just about anything. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with organizations like Pride Toronto and work with your curators to apply an anti-oppressive lens to the way they do event organizing. I have applied an anti oppressive lens to the way I do therapy and clinical supervision with other therapists. You can apply an anti oppressive lens to teaching. You can apply it to student advising, you can apply it to just about anything. I’ve been working with fitness professionals looking at applying an anti oppressive lens to the way that they support folks that are on their fitness journey. So so it’s about looking at whatever practice whatever context you are working in and using that platform to be able to oppose oppression and all of its forms. So that’s essentially what it is.

Sarah Taylor [00:05:29]

And so when someone takes courses like anti oppressive communication course or participates in your courses what can they expect to be talking about or learning?

Tenniel Brown [00:05:37]

Absolutely so I think one of the most important things is to sort of pull back a little bit of you know the cover on this because I think anti oppressive language is its own language. It’s like Spanish. And you see so many people getting themselves into some rather serious trouble these days because they actually don’t know the language they don’t understand… in some ways the harm of some of the things that they’re doing and saying the deep harm of that. You get a lot of people who don’t really know how to talk about these issues. And so you go into a shame spiral and you just don’t talk. You just get very quiet and I always argue that you know the silence piece is a part of how we got ourselves into this trouble as a human society in the first place. So what I offer is something for everybody. I think over the years what folks have said to me is is even somebody who’s maybe got a social work background and knows about anti oppressive practice when they come to one of my trainings they find that they are moved further along in their application of that perspective around “OK, well what does this mean when I’m interacting with somebody right here in a one on one context.” Other people that are completely brand new have never had the chance to learn any of this language or understand any of these concepts have said over the years that they felt like they left with a really good sense of what this topic is. But not just that practical skills. I’m all about practical skills. I want to offer things that folks can use tomorrow today and the next day and my mission is also for folks to leave his training and talk about it. Tell a friend, tell a colleague, tell a family member, and feel equipped to be able to engage in these conversations. So when someone is saying or doing something problematic, you have this confidence in the skills to be able to interpret what’s going on there and to be able to talk to them and to be able to address it. The other thing that I do is I couch everything that I do in my trainings in a self care and team care perspective. And I think this is very important. We have to look after our emotions. We have to look after ourselves and we have to look after each other. I always say you could be as anti oppressive as you want but if you haven’t had any lunch… if you haven’t eaten anything… you’re not good.

Sarah Taylor [00:07:57]

You’ve got the hangries!

Tenniel Brown [00:07:59]

Trust me, Anti-Oppressive work requires patience. It requires empathy. It requires compassion and self compassion. You will fall down a lot and I find you know and I talk a lot about cancel culture and don’t get me wrong really that could be its own podcast.

Sarah Taylor [00:08:19]

Totally. Especially in this industry.

Tenniel Brown [00:08:22]

Look we need to talk about this and I get why certain people are being canceled for sure. And yet as someone who does this work I recognize that I’m so thankful I wasn’t canceled because over the years I’ve done and said things before I knew before I took a course like this before I had an opportunity to learn what was problematic about my lens. I’m so thankful that I was able to make those mistakes in a safe environment and actually benefit from that and grow. So people get a safe environment to learn language and understand what is going on, what is oppression, if oppression is so bad why don’t we just stop this. Well I unpack that for folks. Why is this so complicated and why doesn’t this just stop. And then I provide practical skills for folks to be able to apply this to their lives and their communication. I think the other thing that I think folks get is not just sort of a general whatever, you’ll find that I’m really interested in applying it to film editors and what it is that you do on a regular basis and looking at how you can use your platform to be able to actually oppose oppression.

Sarah Taylor [00:09:31]

Yeah well it’s like it’s huge I know for myself we did anti oppression workshop as a board for the CCE. I’m in an interracial marriage and so I thought “Oh I know a lot.” Like I’ve been unpacking this stuff for a while and understanding in my own way. But also like kind of like how do I say it to my white uncle who is racist like how do I approach that. And by taking that one course, like you said I got so much more understanding of where people might come from and the language and I could approach it not by just being angry because anytime I’d hear anything I was like “You’re talking about my husband, you’re talking about my child! This is not OK!” And so it made a huge impact on me and I felt like I kind of knew some stuff but I realized that there was so much more to learn. And I think I’m still learning and it’s opened up even conversations I’ve had with my husband and my in-laws… and so I think people who are in my situation are like “no I’m cool I got I’m married to so-and-so or I have my best friend or whatever.” You grew up in your lens and there’s way more to learn and unpack.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:41]

Absolutely. Absolutely it’s so true. And I always say that absolutely positively nobody gets a pass on this.

Sarah Taylor [00:10:48]

100 percent.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:49]

At all. You know myself as someone who identifies as a black fem queer woman, you know folks would be like well you know you of course you couldn’t oppress. And it’s like yes we are all susceptible to experiencing oppression and we are all oppressors. So I have aspects of my identity that allow me to have privilege. And the thing about this is that if you’re not aware of those things that’s how you harm people that’s how you engage in micro aggressions. You know what I mean? That’s how you you know get striking up a conversation with someone about your latest renovation in your house when this person is still renting and doesn’t even have access. These are the types of things that you’re never protected from. Right. Like you’re not protected from that in a certain way. So it’s really important to remember that.

Sarah Taylor [00:11:40]

Where should someone start if they’re like feeling overwhelmed they’re like wow I know that I need to make this change. I’ve seen all this information now on social media and I’m saying all the wrong things and like you said I’m just going to be quiet which is not the right thing to do. So where do they go and what should they focus on first to just like get into this mindset of making these changes?

Tenniel Brown [00:12:02]

That’s a great question. And what I would say is education. Not a coincidence right? So of course you know joining with you know your organization to offer this to the community because I think that’s step number one. I think we do need to have good information about… you need to educate yourself. I would say that it’s a really important first step to really listen, and I find even when you have more information and you have more training it even improves the way that you can listen because what you find is when you don’t have that knowledge there’s certain things that are sort of prevent you from even being open. So I find the training and the skills and the confidence that you get from doing the course like this allows you to even listen deeper right and understand more and I think that that’s step number one. I think that once… but don’t stay there! Because I think a lot of people oh I’m listening but really it’s just their guilt and shame. So yeah they’re still not doing anything but once you’ve had the chance to listen you now can start thinking more about your platform and I think that’s one of the most important thing for your listeners to know that if it’s like well I’m not a social worker I’m not a therapist what’s this got to do with me it’s like it has everything to do with you. You have a platform as a film editor and it’s important for you to acknowledge that there are big ways and small ways that you can make a difference. And we all have a responsibility. What’s happened in this world since COVID what’s happened in this world since June is we can no longer close our eyes to this. We have to look at this and all the years that we have stayed silent on this has been what’s caused the problem. So the reality is is that we all are called to use our platform to be able to address this to look around the room and be like who isn’t here? To look around your history of the films that you and different projects you’ve been involved in and being like how many of these people, how many of these stories featured stories that were outside of what we usually see? Right. And looking at the ways that you can use your platform and your influence to be able to make a change, so we’re all called to do that I don’t care if you’re a child care worker or a housekeeper do some working at a gas station, it literally doesn’t matter we’re all a part of this human society. We all have some sort of platform and so we all have a responsibility to do something. You know Sarah one of my favorite slogans that’s come out of the protest is “Silence is Violence.” I love that one because I know what happens when people don’t have education and knowledge. They go into a shame cycle they go into a guilt cycle and they go into fear and you know what happens there? Shh. And you know what, that doesn’t help anybody at all. So I recognize that these are difficult things for us to unpack but we all have a responsibility to use whatever platform we have to make a difference. So starting by educating yourself, listening a lot, and then that’s going to help you to be more open to what you can do. And then looking at your platform whether that be personal or professional to make a change.

Sarah Taylor [00:15:20]

That was perfect. Yeah. That’s huge. And even since I took my training and even just since I’ve done my own inner work I noticed like I wouldn’t pick certain shots anymore or there’ll be things in my edit where I’m like “that’s a stereotype” or “No that’s not going to work. We can’t do that we can’t have that.” And so I think if everybody’s doing that then what we’re seeing on screen can start changing.

Tenniel Brown [00:15:45]

Absolutely. Absolutely and there’s these you know there’s there’s big ways and then there’s little ways like you describe. So it’s it is about really curating your lens, right and making sure that you’re seeing more and I think training like this just helps you to really open up your lens. So you’re not just seeing directly what’s in front of you work to the side of you but it’s more of like a panoramic view which you folks really need in the work that you do.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:09]

100 percent. Yeah. Well I hope that our membership joins us. I know we’ve already been getting people RSVPing which is very exciting. On July 27 2020 to learn and to unpack and to take part and just hopefully we can continue to do stuff with you and just keep educating and making the changes we can make.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:28]

Yeah. Join us. Join us. Don’t hesitate folks. Be a part of this. I’m really looking forward to working with everybody. And you know what we’re gonna have fun. I know these topics are really heavy but we’re gonna have some fun and we’re really going to connect with each other as a community so I look forward to meeting everybody at this training.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:46]

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me today and I look forward to seeing you on the 27th and continuing my journey. So thank you for doing this for us and thank you for sharing your knowledge and your experience with the world. So thank you so much.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:59]

You’re so welcome. Thanks for having me.

Sarah Taylor [00:17:03]

Thank you so much for joining us today. And a big thank you goes to Tenniel Brown and a special thanks to Maureen Grant and Jane MacRae. If you’d like to connect with Tenniel, you can find her on Instagram @TennielBrown. If you’d like to bring Tenniel into your organization to learn more about anti oppressive work, you can check out her website at brownconsulting.com. I look forward to learning more from Tenniel on July 27 2020 at the CCE Lunch and Learn I hope to see you there. The CCE has been supporting BIPOC TV and FILM. BIPOC TV and FILM is a grassroots organization and collective of black, indigenous, and people of colour in Canada’s TV and film industry. From writers, directors, producers, and actors, to editors, crew members, and executives. Their members are a mix of emerging, mid-level, and established industry professionals. BIPOC TV and FILM is dedicated to increasing the representation of BIPOC both in front and behind the camera. If you would like to donate to BIPOC TV and FILM please head to their website at bipoctvandfilm.com. The CCE is taking steps to build a more equitable ecosystem within our industry and we encourage our members to participate in any way they can. 

The main title sound design was created by Jane Tattersall. Additional ADR recording by Andrea Rusch. Original music provided by Chad Blain. This episode was mixed and mastered by Tony Bao. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and tell your friends to tune in. Til next time I’m your host Sarah Taylor.

Outtro

The CCE is a non-profit organization with the goal of bettering the art and science of picture editing. If you wish to become a CCE member please visit our website www.cceditors.ca. Join our great community of Canadian editors for more related info.

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Credits

A special thanks goes to

Alison Dowler

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE

Hosted and Produced by

Sarah Taylor

Main Title Sound Design by

Jane Tattersall

ADR Recording by

Andrea Rusch

Mixed and Mastered by

Tony Bao

Original Music by

Chad Blain

Sponsor Narration by

Paul Winestock

Sponsored by

DGC Alberta

Categories
The Editors Cut

Episode 91 – Totally Killer & Fresh off the Boat with Jermey Cohen

Episode 091 - Totally Killer & Fresh off the Boat with Jermey Cohen

Jeremy Cohen is an Emmy-nominated film and TV editor with over 20 years of industry experience.

He is currently based in LA, where he has worked on shows such as FRESH OFF THE BOAT, CHILDRENS HOSPITAL, YOUNG ROCK, ALI WONG: DON WONG AND WHO IS AMERICA?, for which he was nominated for an Emmy. 

Most recently, he worked on Amazon Prime’s TOTALLY KILLER, which is his debut feature. He has a diverse range, having worked on a wide variety of genres, and his motto about what he wants to work on in the future is “cool stuff with cool people.”

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The Editor’s Cut – Episode 030 – “What is Anti-Oppression? With Tenniel Brown”

Sarah Taylor [00:00:01]

Hello and welcome to The Editor’s Cut. I’m your host Sarah Taylor. At the CCE, we began our journey of self education with Anti-Oppression training in 2019. It was invaluable for us as it provided us with tools to assess how we as an organization could set a course of action to root our unconscious and systematic bias in our operations. This training is now a permanent part of our budget so future board members and volunteers can continue this work, and equity can be part of the fabric of our organization. We are offering a Lunch and Learn Introduction To Anti Oppressive Communication with Tenniel Brown on July 27. Today I’m lucky to be able to sit down with Tenniel Brown and discuss what Anti-Oppressive training is and what we can expect from this webinar. Tenniel Brown is a passionate anti-racist anti oppression and mental health speaker dedicated to improving the experiences of marginalized people in all institutional settings. She is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication which specializes in providing anti oppressive, trauma-informed counseling, clinical supervision and organizational consulting, as well as customized workshops training and team retreats. I’m joined with Tenniel Brown, she is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication based in Toronto. And we just want to have a little conversation about why anti oppression work is important in this and all days but specifically right now. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background and why you started the Center For Anti-Oppressive Communication.

Tenniel Brown [00:01:41]

My background is as a psychotherapist. So I spent I’ve spent many many years working with individuals and couples and families and groups helping them to access more of their well-being by addressing different mental health issues specifically trauma. One of the things that I specialize in addressing is racialized trauma. But also trauma that comes from folks that have experienced different types of oppression. And I think for most people that are called to this type of work it’s quite personal for me right. So often when you don’t see the work that you know needs to happen in the community taking place you create it. And so that was me. You know I think I saw that there was a need for organizations to have somebody come in and not just talk about diversity inclusion but talk about what happens when certain identities have power and that unbalance of power and how to actually address that in our communication. I knew that out in the community there were therapists and social workers that were wanting to do better work. You know work in the best practice way with clients that are black, racialized, queer, and trans, and had nowhere to go to get supervision and support. And finally I knew personally that there were so many folks that when they were ready to do therapy work they needed to see someone sitting across the office that looked like them or had a very similar lived experience and they just were not going to come unless that was the case. So all these things I knew was happening and nobody was doing it. And I said someone’s got to do something and that was me. I think what needs to come out of what’s happened in June is for folks to see black professionals and black community in in the in sort of like the the brilliance of what we do and it’s not uncommon that in many cases where we don’t see ourselves we create it. So yeah that was the spirit of and I think that when I started the organization I knew that it was important for there to be a place where folks from those different backgrounds could come and get that support and information. So it’s a real passion of mine. It is my baby and it’s so beautiful to see folks wanting this information during this time.

Sarah Taylor [00:04:01]

Yeah so important. Can you tell us what Anti-Oppression means and what someone can expect by taking an anti oppressive workshop?

Tenniel Brown [00:04:10]

Sure absolutely. So when you sort of break down the word anti oppression anti oppressive practice we take a look at that anti part and essentially that that just means opposition to oppression and then the practice part. So AOP… the practice part pertains to the context in which you are practicing opposition to oppression. So you can apply an anti oppressive lens to just about anything. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with organizations like Pride Toronto and work with your curators to apply an anti-oppressive lens to the way they do event organizing. I have applied an anti oppressive lens to the way I do therapy and clinical supervision with other therapists. You can apply an anti oppressive lens to teaching. You can apply it to student advising, you can apply it to just about anything. I’ve been working with fitness professionals looking at applying an anti oppressive lens to the way that they support folks that are on their fitness journey. So so it’s about looking at whatever practice whatever context you are working in and using that platform to be able to oppose oppression and all of its forms. So that’s essentially what it is.

Sarah Taylor [00:05:29]

And so when someone takes courses like anti oppressive communication course or participates in your courses what can they expect to be talking about or learning?

Tenniel Brown [00:05:37]

Absolutely so I think one of the most important things is to sort of pull back a little bit of you know the cover on this because I think anti oppressive language is its own language. It’s like Spanish. And you see so many people getting themselves into some rather serious trouble these days because they actually don’t know the language they don’t understand… in some ways the harm of some of the things that they’re doing and saying the deep harm of that. You get a lot of people who don’t really know how to talk about these issues. And so you go into a shame spiral and you just don’t talk. You just get very quiet and I always argue that you know the silence piece is a part of how we got ourselves into this trouble as a human society in the first place. So what I offer is something for everybody. I think over the years what folks have said to me is is even somebody who’s maybe got a social work background and knows about anti oppressive practice when they come to one of my trainings they find that they are moved further along in their application of that perspective around “OK, well what does this mean when I’m interacting with somebody right here in a one on one context.” Other people that are completely brand new have never had the chance to learn any of this language or understand any of these concepts have said over the years that they felt like they left with a really good sense of what this topic is. But not just that practical skills. I’m all about practical skills. I want to offer things that folks can use tomorrow today and the next day and my mission is also for folks to leave his training and talk about it. Tell a friend, tell a colleague, tell a family member, and feel equipped to be able to engage in these conversations. So when someone is saying or doing something problematic, you have this confidence in the skills to be able to interpret what’s going on there and to be able to talk to them and to be able to address it. The other thing that I do is I couch everything that I do in my trainings in a self care and team care perspective. And I think this is very important. We have to look after our emotions. We have to look after ourselves and we have to look after each other. I always say you could be as anti oppressive as you want but if you haven’t had any lunch… if you haven’t eaten anything… you’re not good.

Sarah Taylor [00:07:57]

You’ve got the hangries!

Tenniel Brown [00:07:59]

Trust me, Anti-Oppressive work requires patience. It requires empathy. It requires compassion and self compassion. You will fall down a lot and I find you know and I talk a lot about cancel culture and don’t get me wrong really that could be its own podcast.

Sarah Taylor [00:08:19]

Totally. Especially in this industry.

Tenniel Brown [00:08:22]

Look we need to talk about this and I get why certain people are being canceled for sure. And yet as someone who does this work I recognize that I’m so thankful I wasn’t canceled because over the years I’ve done and said things before I knew before I took a course like this before I had an opportunity to learn what was problematic about my lens. I’m so thankful that I was able to make those mistakes in a safe environment and actually benefit from that and grow. So people get a safe environment to learn language and understand what is going on, what is oppression, if oppression is so bad why don’t we just stop this. Well I unpack that for folks. Why is this so complicated and why doesn’t this just stop. And then I provide practical skills for folks to be able to apply this to their lives and their communication. I think the other thing that I think folks get is not just sort of a general whatever, you’ll find that I’m really interested in applying it to film editors and what it is that you do on a regular basis and looking at how you can use your platform to be able to actually oppose oppression.

Sarah Taylor [00:09:31]

Yeah well it’s like it’s huge I know for myself we did anti oppression workshop as a board for the CCE. I’m in an interracial marriage and so I thought “Oh I know a lot.” Like I’ve been unpacking this stuff for a while and understanding in my own way. But also like kind of like how do I say it to my white uncle who is racist like how do I approach that. And by taking that one course, like you said I got so much more understanding of where people might come from and the language and I could approach it not by just being angry because anytime I’d hear anything I was like “You’re talking about my husband, you’re talking about my child! This is not OK!” And so it made a huge impact on me and I felt like I kind of knew some stuff but I realized that there was so much more to learn. And I think I’m still learning and it’s opened up even conversations I’ve had with my husband and my in-laws… and so I think people who are in my situation are like “no I’m cool I got I’m married to so-and-so or I have my best friend or whatever.” You grew up in your lens and there’s way more to learn and unpack.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:41]

Absolutely. Absolutely it’s so true. And I always say that absolutely positively nobody gets a pass on this.

Sarah Taylor [00:10:48]

100 percent.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:49]

At all. You know myself as someone who identifies as a black fem queer woman, you know folks would be like well you know you of course you couldn’t oppress. And it’s like yes we are all susceptible to experiencing oppression and we are all oppressors. So I have aspects of my identity that allow me to have privilege. And the thing about this is that if you’re not aware of those things that’s how you harm people that’s how you engage in micro aggressions. You know what I mean? That’s how you you know get striking up a conversation with someone about your latest renovation in your house when this person is still renting and doesn’t even have access. These are the types of things that you’re never protected from. Right. Like you’re not protected from that in a certain way. So it’s really important to remember that.

Sarah Taylor [00:11:40]

Where should someone start if they’re like feeling overwhelmed they’re like wow I know that I need to make this change. I’ve seen all this information now on social media and I’m saying all the wrong things and like you said I’m just going to be quiet which is not the right thing to do. So where do they go and what should they focus on first to just like get into this mindset of making these changes?

Tenniel Brown [00:12:02]

That’s a great question. And what I would say is education. Not a coincidence right? So of course you know joining with you know your organization to offer this to the community because I think that’s step number one. I think we do need to have good information about… you need to educate yourself. I would say that it’s a really important first step to really listen, and I find even when you have more information and you have more training it even improves the way that you can listen because what you find is when you don’t have that knowledge there’s certain things that are sort of prevent you from even being open. So I find the training and the skills and the confidence that you get from doing the course like this allows you to even listen deeper right and understand more and I think that that’s step number one. I think that once… but don’t stay there! Because I think a lot of people oh I’m listening but really it’s just their guilt and shame. So yeah they’re still not doing anything but once you’ve had the chance to listen you now can start thinking more about your platform and I think that’s one of the most important thing for your listeners to know that if it’s like well I’m not a social worker I’m not a therapist what’s this got to do with me it’s like it has everything to do with you. You have a platform as a film editor and it’s important for you to acknowledge that there are big ways and small ways that you can make a difference. And we all have a responsibility. What’s happened in this world since COVID what’s happened in this world since June is we can no longer close our eyes to this. We have to look at this and all the years that we have stayed silent on this has been what’s caused the problem. So the reality is is that we all are called to use our platform to be able to address this to look around the room and be like who isn’t here? To look around your history of the films that you and different projects you’ve been involved in and being like how many of these people, how many of these stories featured stories that were outside of what we usually see? Right. And looking at the ways that you can use your platform and your influence to be able to make a change, so we’re all called to do that I don’t care if you’re a child care worker or a housekeeper do some working at a gas station, it literally doesn’t matter we’re all a part of this human society. We all have some sort of platform and so we all have a responsibility to do something. You know Sarah one of my favorite slogans that’s come out of the protest is “Silence is Violence.” I love that one because I know what happens when people don’t have education and knowledge. They go into a shame cycle they go into a guilt cycle and they go into fear and you know what happens there? Shh. And you know what, that doesn’t help anybody at all. So I recognize that these are difficult things for us to unpack but we all have a responsibility to use whatever platform we have to make a difference. So starting by educating yourself, listening a lot, and then that’s going to help you to be more open to what you can do. And then looking at your platform whether that be personal or professional to make a change.

Sarah Taylor [00:15:20]

That was perfect. Yeah. That’s huge. And even since I took my training and even just since I’ve done my own inner work I noticed like I wouldn’t pick certain shots anymore or there’ll be things in my edit where I’m like “that’s a stereotype” or “No that’s not going to work. We can’t do that we can’t have that.” And so I think if everybody’s doing that then what we’re seeing on screen can start changing.

Tenniel Brown [00:15:45]

Absolutely. Absolutely and there’s these you know there’s there’s big ways and then there’s little ways like you describe. So it’s it is about really curating your lens, right and making sure that you’re seeing more and I think training like this just helps you to really open up your lens. So you’re not just seeing directly what’s in front of you work to the side of you but it’s more of like a panoramic view which you folks really need in the work that you do.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:09]

100 percent. Yeah. Well I hope that our membership joins us. I know we’ve already been getting people RSVPing which is very exciting. On July 27 2020 to learn and to unpack and to take part and just hopefully we can continue to do stuff with you and just keep educating and making the changes we can make.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:28]

Yeah. Join us. Join us. Don’t hesitate folks. Be a part of this. I’m really looking forward to working with everybody. And you know what we’re gonna have fun. I know these topics are really heavy but we’re gonna have some fun and we’re really going to connect with each other as a community so I look forward to meeting everybody at this training.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:46]

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me today and I look forward to seeing you on the 27th and continuing my journey. So thank you for doing this for us and thank you for sharing your knowledge and your experience with the world. So thank you so much.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:59]

You’re so welcome. Thanks for having me.

Sarah Taylor [00:17:03]

Thank you so much for joining us today. And a big thank you goes to Tenniel Brown and a special thanks to Maureen Grant and Jane MacRae. If you’d like to connect with Tenniel, you can find her on Instagram @TennielBrown. If you’d like to bring Tenniel into your organization to learn more about anti oppressive work, you can check out her website at brownconsulting.com. I look forward to learning more from Tenniel on July 27 2020 at the CCE Lunch and Learn I hope to see you there. The CCE has been supporting BIPOC TV and FILM. BIPOC TV and FILM is a grassroots organization and collective of black, indigenous, and people of colour in Canada’s TV and film industry. From writers, directors, producers, and actors, to editors, crew members, and executives. Their members are a mix of emerging, mid-level, and established industry professionals. BIPOC TV and FILM is dedicated to increasing the representation of BIPOC both in front and behind the camera. If you would like to donate to BIPOC TV and FILM please head to their website at bipoctvandfilm.com. The CCE is taking steps to build a more equitable ecosystem within our industry and we encourage our members to participate in any way they can. 

The main title sound design was created by Jane Tattersall. Additional ADR recording by Andrea Rusch. Original music provided by Chad Blain. This episode was mixed and mastered by Tony Bao. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and tell your friends to tune in. Til next time I’m your host Sarah Taylor.

Outtro

The CCE is a non-profit organization with the goal of bettering the art and science of picture editing. If you wish to become a CCE member please visit our website www.cceditors.ca. Join our great community of Canadian editors for more related info.

Subscribe Wherever You Get Your Podcasts

What do you want to hear on The Editors Cut?

Please send along any topics you would like us to cover or editors you would love to hear from:

Credits

A special thanks goes to

Alison Dowler

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE

Hosted and Produced by

Sarah Taylor

Main Title Sound Design by

Jane Tattersall

ADR Recording by

Andrea Rusch

Mixed and Mastered by

Tony Bao

Original Music by

Chad Blain

Sponsor Narration by

Paul Winestock

Sponsored by

DGC Alberta

Categories
Articles

2024 Canadian Screen Award Nominations

2024 Canadian Screen Award Nominations

CSA Logo

Congratulations to our CCE members who were nominated for a 2024 Canadian Screen Award!

Best Picture Editing, Drama | Meilleur montage, drame
  • Sandy Pereira, Dev Singh & Chris Mutton, CCE – Essex County: Episode 10

  • Maxime Lahaie-Denis – Little Bird: Burning Down The House

  • Justin Lachance, CCE – Little Bird: The Land that Takes You

  • Wesley Finucan – The Love Club: Tara

  • Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE – Moonshine: High Season

Best Picture Editing, Factual | Meilleur montage, émission factuelle
  • James Hebbard (+ 1 editor) – Sarah’s Mountain Escape: Shrink Wrap Reno

Best Picture Editing, Documentary | Meilleur montage, documentaire
  • Ashley Gilmour – Black Life: Untold Stories – Haven, But No Heaven

  • Steven Budd (+1 editor) – Dark Side of Comedy: Robin Williams

  • Nick Hector, CCE- The Man Who Stole Einstein’s Brain

Best Picture Editing, Reality/Competition | Meilleur montage, téléréalité ou concours
  • Wesley Finucan & Baun Mah – The Big Bake: Creepy Carnival

  • Jonathan Dowler, CCE, Al Manson, CCE, Michael Emberley (+14 editors) – Big Brother Canada: Episode 1

  • Kyle Power – Canada’s Drag Race: Canada vs. The World: Comedy Queens

  • Jonathan Dowler, CCE – Canada’s Drag Race: Canada vs. The World: Grand Finale

Best Picture Editing, Comedy | Meilleure montage, humoristique
  • Gloria Tong – Bria Mack Gets A Life: Bria Mack Gets a Job

  • Kyle Martin, CCE – Children Ruin Everything: Money

  • Sam Thomson – Sort Of: Sort Of Gone Again

  • Maureen Grant, CCE – Sort Of: Sort Of Hospital Again

Best Picture Editing, Children’s or Youth | Meilleur montage, émission pour enfants ou jeunesse
  • Lindsay Ragone – All-Round Champion: Arcathlon

  • Thomas Lieu – The Hardy Boys: A Vanishing Act

  • Victor CH Fan & Rob Chandler – I Woke Up A Vampire: I Woke Up A Vampire

  • Mike Reisacher – Popularity Papers: New School, New Start

Achievement in Editing | Meilleur montage
  • Isabelle Malenfant, CCE – The Dishwasher | Le plongeur

Best Editing in a Feature Length Documentary | Meilleur montage dans un long métrage documentaire
  • Anouk Deschênes – The Longest Goodbye

Best Picture Editing, Web Program or Series | Meilleur montage, émission ou série Web
  • Ashley Brook (+2 editors) – Canadiana: How the Cold War Started in Ottawa

  • Pauline Decroix (+1 editor) – How to Fail as a Popstar: The Record Deal

  • Maureen Grant, CCE – I Hate People, People Hate Me: Bad-Existing

Categories
The Editors Cut

Episode 090 – EditCon 2023: Our Voices, Our Stories

Episode 90: EditCon 2023: Our Voices, Our Stories

Episode 90 - EditCon 2023: Our Voices, Our Stories

In a media landscape that favours rapid consumption and uniformity, Canadian cinema has become a vessel for diverse stories.

RICEBOY SLEEPS portrays the struggles of immigration, while we embark on the search for the next stage of human evolution in CRIMES OF THE FUTURE. In VIKING, we find a reflection on the human condition in an attempt to explore Mars. Video rental nostalgia and adolescent cinephilia come together in the film I LIKE MOVIES. In this episode the editors from these riveting Canadian films join us in a panel conversation.

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The Editor’s Cut – Episode 030 – “What is Anti-Oppression? With Tenniel Brown”

Sarah Taylor [00:00:01]

Hello and welcome to The Editor’s Cut. I’m your host Sarah Taylor. At the CCE, we began our journey of self education with Anti-Oppression training in 2019. It was invaluable for us as it provided us with tools to assess how we as an organization could set a course of action to root our unconscious and systematic bias in our operations. This training is now a permanent part of our budget so future board members and volunteers can continue this work, and equity can be part of the fabric of our organization. We are offering a Lunch and Learn Introduction To Anti Oppressive Communication with Tenniel Brown on July 27. Today I’m lucky to be able to sit down with Tenniel Brown and discuss what Anti-Oppressive training is and what we can expect from this webinar. Tenniel Brown is a passionate anti-racist anti oppression and mental health speaker dedicated to improving the experiences of marginalized people in all institutional settings. She is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication which specializes in providing anti oppressive, trauma-informed counseling, clinical supervision and organizational consulting, as well as customized workshops training and team retreats. I’m joined with Tenniel Brown, she is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication based in Toronto. And we just want to have a little conversation about why anti oppression work is important in this and all days but specifically right now. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background and why you started the Center For Anti-Oppressive Communication.

Tenniel Brown [00:01:41]

My background is as a psychotherapist. So I spent I’ve spent many many years working with individuals and couples and families and groups helping them to access more of their well-being by addressing different mental health issues specifically trauma. One of the things that I specialize in addressing is racialized trauma. But also trauma that comes from folks that have experienced different types of oppression. And I think for most people that are called to this type of work it’s quite personal for me right. So often when you don’t see the work that you know needs to happen in the community taking place you create it. And so that was me. You know I think I saw that there was a need for organizations to have somebody come in and not just talk about diversity inclusion but talk about what happens when certain identities have power and that unbalance of power and how to actually address that in our communication. I knew that out in the community there were therapists and social workers that were wanting to do better work. You know work in the best practice way with clients that are black, racialized, queer, and trans, and had nowhere to go to get supervision and support. And finally I knew personally that there were so many folks that when they were ready to do therapy work they needed to see someone sitting across the office that looked like them or had a very similar lived experience and they just were not going to come unless that was the case. So all these things I knew was happening and nobody was doing it. And I said someone’s got to do something and that was me. I think what needs to come out of what’s happened in June is for folks to see black professionals and black community in in the in sort of like the the brilliance of what we do and it’s not uncommon that in many cases where we don’t see ourselves we create it. So yeah that was the spirit of and I think that when I started the organization I knew that it was important for there to be a place where folks from those different backgrounds could come and get that support and information. So it’s a real passion of mine. It is my baby and it’s so beautiful to see folks wanting this information during this time.

Sarah Taylor [00:04:01]

Yeah so important. Can you tell us what Anti-Oppression means and what someone can expect by taking an anti oppressive workshop?

Tenniel Brown [00:04:10]

Sure absolutely. So when you sort of break down the word anti oppression anti oppressive practice we take a look at that anti part and essentially that that just means opposition to oppression and then the practice part. So AOP… the practice part pertains to the context in which you are practicing opposition to oppression. So you can apply an anti oppressive lens to just about anything. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with organizations like Pride Toronto and work with your curators to apply an anti-oppressive lens to the way they do event organizing. I have applied an anti oppressive lens to the way I do therapy and clinical supervision with other therapists. You can apply an anti oppressive lens to teaching. You can apply it to student advising, you can apply it to just about anything. I’ve been working with fitness professionals looking at applying an anti oppressive lens to the way that they support folks that are on their fitness journey. So so it’s about looking at whatever practice whatever context you are working in and using that platform to be able to oppose oppression and all of its forms. So that’s essentially what it is.

Sarah Taylor [00:05:29]

And so when someone takes courses like anti oppressive communication course or participates in your courses what can they expect to be talking about or learning?

Tenniel Brown [00:05:37]

Absolutely so I think one of the most important things is to sort of pull back a little bit of you know the cover on this because I think anti oppressive language is its own language. It’s like Spanish. And you see so many people getting themselves into some rather serious trouble these days because they actually don’t know the language they don’t understand… in some ways the harm of some of the things that they’re doing and saying the deep harm of that. You get a lot of people who don’t really know how to talk about these issues. And so you go into a shame spiral and you just don’t talk. You just get very quiet and I always argue that you know the silence piece is a part of how we got ourselves into this trouble as a human society in the first place. So what I offer is something for everybody. I think over the years what folks have said to me is is even somebody who’s maybe got a social work background and knows about anti oppressive practice when they come to one of my trainings they find that they are moved further along in their application of that perspective around “OK, well what does this mean when I’m interacting with somebody right here in a one on one context.” Other people that are completely brand new have never had the chance to learn any of this language or understand any of these concepts have said over the years that they felt like they left with a really good sense of what this topic is. But not just that practical skills. I’m all about practical skills. I want to offer things that folks can use tomorrow today and the next day and my mission is also for folks to leave his training and talk about it. Tell a friend, tell a colleague, tell a family member, and feel equipped to be able to engage in these conversations. So when someone is saying or doing something problematic, you have this confidence in the skills to be able to interpret what’s going on there and to be able to talk to them and to be able to address it. The other thing that I do is I couch everything that I do in my trainings in a self care and team care perspective. And I think this is very important. We have to look after our emotions. We have to look after ourselves and we have to look after each other. I always say you could be as anti oppressive as you want but if you haven’t had any lunch… if you haven’t eaten anything… you’re not good.

Sarah Taylor [00:07:57]

You’ve got the hangries!

Tenniel Brown [00:07:59]

Trust me, Anti-Oppressive work requires patience. It requires empathy. It requires compassion and self compassion. You will fall down a lot and I find you know and I talk a lot about cancel culture and don’t get me wrong really that could be its own podcast.

Sarah Taylor [00:08:19]

Totally. Especially in this industry.

Tenniel Brown [00:08:22]

Look we need to talk about this and I get why certain people are being canceled for sure. And yet as someone who does this work I recognize that I’m so thankful I wasn’t canceled because over the years I’ve done and said things before I knew before I took a course like this before I had an opportunity to learn what was problematic about my lens. I’m so thankful that I was able to make those mistakes in a safe environment and actually benefit from that and grow. So people get a safe environment to learn language and understand what is going on, what is oppression, if oppression is so bad why don’t we just stop this. Well I unpack that for folks. Why is this so complicated and why doesn’t this just stop. And then I provide practical skills for folks to be able to apply this to their lives and their communication. I think the other thing that I think folks get is not just sort of a general whatever, you’ll find that I’m really interested in applying it to film editors and what it is that you do on a regular basis and looking at how you can use your platform to be able to actually oppose oppression.

Sarah Taylor [00:09:31]

Yeah well it’s like it’s huge I know for myself we did anti oppression workshop as a board for the CCE. I’m in an interracial marriage and so I thought “Oh I know a lot.” Like I’ve been unpacking this stuff for a while and understanding in my own way. But also like kind of like how do I say it to my white uncle who is racist like how do I approach that. And by taking that one course, like you said I got so much more understanding of where people might come from and the language and I could approach it not by just being angry because anytime I’d hear anything I was like “You’re talking about my husband, you’re talking about my child! This is not OK!” And so it made a huge impact on me and I felt like I kind of knew some stuff but I realized that there was so much more to learn. And I think I’m still learning and it’s opened up even conversations I’ve had with my husband and my in-laws… and so I think people who are in my situation are like “no I’m cool I got I’m married to so-and-so or I have my best friend or whatever.” You grew up in your lens and there’s way more to learn and unpack.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:41]

Absolutely. Absolutely it’s so true. And I always say that absolutely positively nobody gets a pass on this.

Sarah Taylor [00:10:48]

100 percent.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:49]

At all. You know myself as someone who identifies as a black fem queer woman, you know folks would be like well you know you of course you couldn’t oppress. And it’s like yes we are all susceptible to experiencing oppression and we are all oppressors. So I have aspects of my identity that allow me to have privilege. And the thing about this is that if you’re not aware of those things that’s how you harm people that’s how you engage in micro aggressions. You know what I mean? That’s how you you know get striking up a conversation with someone about your latest renovation in your house when this person is still renting and doesn’t even have access. These are the types of things that you’re never protected from. Right. Like you’re not protected from that in a certain way. So it’s really important to remember that.

Sarah Taylor [00:11:40]

Where should someone start if they’re like feeling overwhelmed they’re like wow I know that I need to make this change. I’ve seen all this information now on social media and I’m saying all the wrong things and like you said I’m just going to be quiet which is not the right thing to do. So where do they go and what should they focus on first to just like get into this mindset of making these changes?

Tenniel Brown [00:12:02]

That’s a great question. And what I would say is education. Not a coincidence right? So of course you know joining with you know your organization to offer this to the community because I think that’s step number one. I think we do need to have good information about… you need to educate yourself. I would say that it’s a really important first step to really listen, and I find even when you have more information and you have more training it even improves the way that you can listen because what you find is when you don’t have that knowledge there’s certain things that are sort of prevent you from even being open. So I find the training and the skills and the confidence that you get from doing the course like this allows you to even listen deeper right and understand more and I think that that’s step number one. I think that once… but don’t stay there! Because I think a lot of people oh I’m listening but really it’s just their guilt and shame. So yeah they’re still not doing anything but once you’ve had the chance to listen you now can start thinking more about your platform and I think that’s one of the most important thing for your listeners to know that if it’s like well I’m not a social worker I’m not a therapist what’s this got to do with me it’s like it has everything to do with you. You have a platform as a film editor and it’s important for you to acknowledge that there are big ways and small ways that you can make a difference. And we all have a responsibility. What’s happened in this world since COVID what’s happened in this world since June is we can no longer close our eyes to this. We have to look at this and all the years that we have stayed silent on this has been what’s caused the problem. So the reality is is that we all are called to use our platform to be able to address this to look around the room and be like who isn’t here? To look around your history of the films that you and different projects you’ve been involved in and being like how many of these people, how many of these stories featured stories that were outside of what we usually see? Right. And looking at the ways that you can use your platform and your influence to be able to make a change, so we’re all called to do that I don’t care if you’re a child care worker or a housekeeper do some working at a gas station, it literally doesn’t matter we’re all a part of this human society. We all have some sort of platform and so we all have a responsibility to do something. You know Sarah one of my favorite slogans that’s come out of the protest is “Silence is Violence.” I love that one because I know what happens when people don’t have education and knowledge. They go into a shame cycle they go into a guilt cycle and they go into fear and you know what happens there? Shh. And you know what, that doesn’t help anybody at all. So I recognize that these are difficult things for us to unpack but we all have a responsibility to use whatever platform we have to make a difference. So starting by educating yourself, listening a lot, and then that’s going to help you to be more open to what you can do. And then looking at your platform whether that be personal or professional to make a change.

Sarah Taylor [00:15:20]

That was perfect. Yeah. That’s huge. And even since I took my training and even just since I’ve done my own inner work I noticed like I wouldn’t pick certain shots anymore or there’ll be things in my edit where I’m like “that’s a stereotype” or “No that’s not going to work. We can’t do that we can’t have that.” And so I think if everybody’s doing that then what we’re seeing on screen can start changing.

Tenniel Brown [00:15:45]

Absolutely. Absolutely and there’s these you know there’s there’s big ways and then there’s little ways like you describe. So it’s it is about really curating your lens, right and making sure that you’re seeing more and I think training like this just helps you to really open up your lens. So you’re not just seeing directly what’s in front of you work to the side of you but it’s more of like a panoramic view which you folks really need in the work that you do.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:09]

100 percent. Yeah. Well I hope that our membership joins us. I know we’ve already been getting people RSVPing which is very exciting. On July 27 2020 to learn and to unpack and to take part and just hopefully we can continue to do stuff with you and just keep educating and making the changes we can make.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:28]

Yeah. Join us. Join us. Don’t hesitate folks. Be a part of this. I’m really looking forward to working with everybody. And you know what we’re gonna have fun. I know these topics are really heavy but we’re gonna have some fun and we’re really going to connect with each other as a community so I look forward to meeting everybody at this training.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:46]

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me today and I look forward to seeing you on the 27th and continuing my journey. So thank you for doing this for us and thank you for sharing your knowledge and your experience with the world. So thank you so much.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:59]

You’re so welcome. Thanks for having me.

Sarah Taylor [00:17:03]

Thank you so much for joining us today. And a big thank you goes to Tenniel Brown and a special thanks to Maureen Grant and Jane MacRae. If you’d like to connect with Tenniel, you can find her on Instagram @TennielBrown. If you’d like to bring Tenniel into your organization to learn more about anti oppressive work, you can check out her website at brownconsulting.com. I look forward to learning more from Tenniel on July 27 2020 at the CCE Lunch and Learn I hope to see you there. The CCE has been supporting BIPOC TV and FILM. BIPOC TV and FILM is a grassroots organization and collective of black, indigenous, and people of colour in Canada’s TV and film industry. From writers, directors, producers, and actors, to editors, crew members, and executives. Their members are a mix of emerging, mid-level, and established industry professionals. BIPOC TV and FILM is dedicated to increasing the representation of BIPOC both in front and behind the camera. If you would like to donate to BIPOC TV and FILM please head to their website at bipoctvandfilm.com. The CCE is taking steps to build a more equitable ecosystem within our industry and we encourage our members to participate in any way they can. 

The main title sound design was created by Jane Tattersall. Additional ADR recording by Andrea Rusch. Original music provided by Chad Blain. This episode was mixed and mastered by Tony Bao. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and tell your friends to tune in. Til next time I’m your host Sarah Taylor.

Outtro

The CCE is a non-profit organization with the goal of bettering the art and science of picture editing. If you wish to become a CCE member please visit our website www.cceditors.ca. Join our great community of Canadian editors for more related info.

Subscribe Wherever You Get Your Podcasts

What do you want to hear on The Editors Cut?

Please send along any topics you would like us to cover or editors you would love to hear from:

Credits

A special thanks goes to

Alison Dowler

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE

Hosted and Produced by

Sarah Taylor

Main Title Sound Design by

Jane Tattersall

ADR Recording by

Andrea Rusch

Mixed and Mastered by

Tony Bao

Original Music by

Chad Blain

Sponsor Narration by

Paul Winestock

Sponsored by

DGC Alberta

Blackmagic Design

Categories
Past Events

EditCon 2024

EditCon 2024

EditCon 2024 in Review

The CCE just completed its 7th annual EditCon with three days of amazing panel talks, virtual breakout rooms, and networking for over two hundred and sixty attendees from Canada and around the world. We hosted in four cities this year in Toronto, Montreal, Edmonton and Vancouver.

We welcomed editors from CANADA’S DRAG RACE, HEY, VIKTOR!, THE DISHWASHER, FITTING IN, THE KING TIDE, WEDNESDAY, MOONSHINE, SHORESY AND FAKES. We also had a guest speaker who presented a panel on AI and the effects in post production.

For our in person events we welcomed the editor from the Oscar nominated documentary, TO KILL A TIGER in Toronto, a one on one with Amélie Labrèche in Montreal, Exploring Documentary in Edmonton and a Horror themed panel in Vancouver!

It wouldn’t be EditCon without wrapping up the weekend with a good old-fashioned giveaway, thanks to prize donations from our generous sponsors.

Missed Attending Live?

Subscribe to our podcasts to be notified about future episodes featuring our EditCon 2024 talks.

Presented in English

Presented in French

Podcast Exclusive

Barbie

BARBIE was one of the biggest hits this summer! Tune in on January 1st for a podcast exclusive, as Sarah Taylor, CCE talks to Nick Houy, ACE about his experience working on a playful film about such a lovely and iconic character with a history spanning several decades.

Nick Houy, ACENick Houy, ACE, is a film editor based in New York. Before editing BARBIE, Houy edited both of Greta Gerwig’s previous Oscar-nominated films, LITTLE WOMEN, and LADY BIRD for which he was nominated for the ACE award in 2017. Houy also won the Emmy Award in 2017 for editing the miniseries, THE NIGHT OF. He was nominated for the Independent Spirit Award for editing MID90S in 2018, and in 2022 Houy edited the critically acclaimed Netflix documentary, STUTZ.

Sarah Taylor, CCESarah Taylor, CCE, a celebrated award-winning editor, is known for amplifying underrepresented voices through her work that has been showcased globally at TIFF, Tribeca, Sundance, Hot Docs, and the Imaginative Film Festival. Her talent spans across documentary, TV series, short and feature length films, making her a versatile force in storytelling. Beyond her editing expertise, she hosts THE EDITOR’S CUT and BRAAAINS podcasts.

Panels (Virtual)

Canada's Drag race

Makeup, fashion, and incredible performances are just a few aspects of this reality television competition. It’s the exuberance and the je ne sais quoi of the show’s queens that make audiences around the world tune in. Who will overcome their inner saboteur and rise to the challenge to win the judges’ hearts and earn the coveted title of “Canada’s Next Drag Superstar”? Now heading into its fifth season, the post production team at CANADA’S DRAG RACE will join us in a panel conversation to tell us about their experience working on such a glamorous and hilarious show. Shantay you’ll want to stay for this panel discussion!

Beth BiedermanBeth Biederman, editor with 17 years experience in Canada, New Zealand and Australia working on documentary, reality, current affairs and children’s programming. No matter the genre above all they strive to bring a sense of humour and realness to each story. When not editing you can find Beth biking, dancing or giving talks on important topics such as bagels. Credits include: CANADA’S DRAG RACE, BONDI VET, THE PROJECT, GABY’S FARM, STYLED and MY RESTAURANT IN INDIA.

Dean’s passion for visual storytelling has guided his more than 20 years in the film and television industry in the roles of editor and director. He began this journey creating experimental short films, performing arts shorts, and music videos. From there he entered the world of factual television working in various genres including competition, true crime and docuseries. The recipient of multiple production grants, and a CSA nomination for best editing, Dean is continually pursuing the next visual storytelling challenge.

Jonathan Dowler, CCE
Jonathan has been in the industry since 2001, both in Australia and Canada. He has cut everything from documentaries, animation, sports news, but his extensive experience has been in cutting reality TV. He has worked on many of the large format shows such as BIG BROTHER, DRAG RACE CANADA, TOP CHEF CANADA, THE AMAZING RACE CANADA and LOVE ISLAND and LOVE ISLAND GAMES. He is a 17 time CSA and 17 time CCE nominated editor and has won five consecutive CSA’s and five CCE Awards.

Lindsay Ragone
Lindsay Ragone is a Toronto-based editor with over 20 years of experience. She’s been nominated twice at the Canadian Screen Awards for her work on CANADA’S DRAG RACE and was an Emmy-nominee for the Scripted/Reality hybrid series THE QUEST on Disney Plus. Other recent credits include BLOWN AWAY for Netflix and ALL-ROUND CHAMPION for BYU.

With a keen eye for storytelling and a solid grip on the technical side of post-production, Zoya Rezaie, started her career in post-production with the NFB, spurring her fascination with factual programming by assisting various documentaries. Expanding her skill set, Zoya excelled as a social media editor, garnering over 50 million showcasing her diverse talents. Her career transitioned seamlessly into VFX editing, contributing to notable projects such as THE DESCENDANTS 2, FARGO’ SEASON 3, and CATCHER WAS A SPY. Uncovering a love for reality television, Zoya ascended from a junior editor on CANADA’S DRAG RACE to Story Editor to Judge Producer. She is also a Host-Producer on CANADA’S GOT TALENT utilizing her extensive post-production expertise to guide and support on-set talent.

The Best in TV Comedy: 2023 CCE Award Nominees

Comedy demands a mastery of pacing to make a story flow but most importantly make the audience laugh. Whether it’s solving mysteries in the coming-of-age comedy horror WEDNESDAY, the misfortunes of a dysfunctional family in MOONSHINE, the attempt to save a mediocre hockey team in SHORESY, or building a business of fake IDs with very real consequences in FAKES. This year we invited 2023 CCE nominees editors of these spectacular shows to tell us about the craft of editing in the comedic genre. Maybe they’ll tell us a joke or two.

Drew MacLeod Drew MacLeod is a Picture Editor based in Toronto with a resume that spans over 40 episodes of Comedy TV and counting. Recognized with award nominations for the Canadian Cinema Editors (CCE), Directors Guild of Canada (DGC), and Canadian Screen Award (CSA), Drew has made a mark on the industry early in his career. His recent accomplishments include cutting the series finale for the final season of Crave TV / Hulu’s LETTERKENNY and is currently in the editing room for the third season of SHORESY. Drew can often be seen sporting a warm smile, a fun attitude, and a healthy moustache.

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE While living in Halifax, Nova Scotia and collaborating with some of the finest directors and showrunners from across Canada, Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE has been remote editing since before it became cool. She has edited feature documentaries, music videos, and everything in between in her thirty year career. More recently, she has been working exclusively in the world of scripted shows – with a soft spot for comedy. Kim’s work has brought her several awards and nominations including a Gemini for CALL ME FITZ and five CSA nominations in the categories of comedy, drama and feature film, with the most recent for the comedy series MOONSHINE.

Sabrina Pitre, CCESabrina Pitre, CCE is an award-winning editor with a natural instinct for storytelling across a wide variety of formats and genres. She approaches her work with unfailing dedication, and thrives on the creative challenges that each project can afford her. Armed with a personable and collaborative spirit, she has formed many professional relationships. She is currently cutting the indie horror film CLOWN IN A CORNFIELD, and is slated to start work on the next feature film installment of FINAL DESTINATION. Outside of editing, Sabrina holds a second career as a voice actor for cartoons. In her spare time, she is secretly training to become an Olympic Curling Champion. Hurry Hard!

Jay Prychidny, CCEJay Prychidny, CCE is a multiple award-winning producer and picture editor, including back-to-back CSA wins in 2017 & 2018 for ORPHAN BLACK and THE AMAZING RACE CANADA. His factual work includes THE WEEK THE WOMEN WENT, TOP CHEF CANADA, and CANADA’S NEXT TOP MODEL, for which he won a Gemini and CCE award in 2010 & 2011. As a producer on ORPHAN BLACK, LOST & FOUND MUSIC STUDIOS, THE NEXT STEP and SNOWPIERCER, he supervised the editing, sound, music, and visual effects for every episode. He just recently finished editing his first feature, SCREAM VI. His latest project is BEETLEJUICE 2, which is his second time working with Tim Burton. He previously edited WEDNESDAY, for which he won a CCE award in 2023.

This Year in Canadian Film

Canadian films are still making their way to the big screen with fascinating themes. FITTING IN grapples with societal notions regarding the relationship between body and womanhood. HEY, VIKTOR! tackles a quest for fame and fortune morphed into a journey of self-discovery. THE KING TIDE reflects on community, fundamentalism, and rejection of a larger world. Heavy metal, violence, gambling addiction, and a never-ending pile of dishes serve as the background in THE DISHWASHER to give us a bumpy ride to redemption. Join us in a conversation with the editors of these films who will share their experiences shaping these stories.

Maureen Grant, CCEMaureen Grant, CCE, is an award-winning film and television editor based in Toronto. She takes pride in being part of projects that are changing and challenging onscreen representation. Her recent work in feature film includes director Molly McGlynn’s FITTING IN (SXSW ‘23, TIFF ‘23), and director V.T. Nayani’s THIS PLACE (TIFF ‘22). Recent television credits include season 3 of SORT OF, STOLEN BY THEIR FATHER, which won a DGC award for Best Editing in MOW, and I HATE PEOPLE, PEOPLE HATE ME, which premiered at Tribeca.

Isabelle Malenfant, CCEIsabelle Malenfant, CCE is a talented and passionate film editor based in Montreal. Over the years, she has worked on a variety of films and television series, earning a reputation for her exceptional collaboration with Francis Leclerc and other renowned filmmakers, such as Yves Simoneau, Louise Archambault, Quentin Dupieux, Olivier Asselin and Mélanie Charbonneau. Isabelle’s talent for storytelling and meticulous editing brings out the best in actors’ performances, earning her several award nominations, including Gémeaux, Jutra, and Iris. Additionally, she has won two CCE awards. Isabelle is also committed to the CCE board of directors, where she serves as Québec representative.

Justin OakeyJustin Oakey is a bilingual filmmaker from rural Newfoundland raised on hunting, fishing, and storytelling. His award-winning short films brought his atmospheric vision of Newfoundland to festivals around the world before his feature debut RIVERHEAD – a micro-budget drama about small town feuding, nominated at the CSAs after a number of festival accolades. A FIRE IN THE COLD SEASON – a rural noir set against remote highway towns, was also nominated at the CSAs. He currently has several features in development – with feverish seal hunt thriller HANGASHORE. Also an accomplished editor of film and television, Justin has most recently worked on the acclaimed fantasy drama THE KING TIDE and the highly-anticipated crime thriller BLOOD FOR DUST.

Sarah Taylor, CCESarah Taylor, CCE, a celebrated award-winning editor, is known for amplifying underrepresented voices through her work that has been showcased globally at TIFF, Tribeca, Sundance, Hot Docs, and the Imaginative Film Festival. Her talent spans across documentary, TV series, short and feature length films, making her a versatile force in storytelling. Beyond her editing expertise, she hosts THE EDITOR’S CUT and BRAAAINS podcasts.

Chandler LevackChandler Levack lives in Toronto, where she studied cinema at the University of Toronto and screenwriting at the Canadian Film Centre. She has directed numerous music videos, earning two JUNO nominations, and is a film critic for the Globe & Mail. In 2022, her debut feature I LIKE MOVIES premiered at TIFF, was selected for Canada’s Top Ten and won prizes around the world. She is currently working on her second feature ANGLOPHONE, a portrait of the 2011 Montreal music scene, with Zapruder Films.

Art X AI: The Stories of Tomorrow

Join Valentine Goddard as she shares her AI presentation that will include information about:

• The use of AI in post-production, editing and workflow
• What the critical social, economic and legal implications are
• The broader context of AI

This presentation will be available in English and French.

Valentine Goddard

​​A lawyer and an artist, Valentine Goddard is a member of Canada’s AI Advisory Council and a UN expert on AI policy and governance. Valentine is the Founder and Executive Director of AI Impact Alliance, an interdisciplinary organization that integrates art-based approaches to the study of the social implications of AI. She provides analyses of emerging AI regulations and policies; designs programs that link civic engagement, knowledge mobilization and policy innovation. Her curatorial best practices aim to facilitate Responsible AI. She is a Mozilla Creative Media Awardee and is leading the Art Impact AI Coalition, where close to 2,000 signatories are demanding to be at the table of generative AI regulation.

In Person Events

Edmonton: Exploring Documentary

Join us in Edmonton, Alberta, for an enlightening afternoon as documentary editors share their insights and experiences. Explore the art of storytelling through the lens of editing and gain a deeper understanding of the creative process behind these captivating Alberta-made documentaries; THE LEBANESE BURGER MAFIA, SEND KELP, PUSH, BLIND AMBITION: WOP MAY and ARTHUR ERICKSON’S DYDE HOUSE.

Don’t miss this opportunity to connect with industry professionals and fellow enthusiasts in the Alberta film community.

Krystal MossWith over 15 years of award-winning experience, Krystal strives to inspire, educate, and captivate her audiences through exceptional documentary editing. Born and raised in Edmonton, she developed a love for editing while studying Design & Motion Image at MacEwan University, and has since become a sought-after collaborator in the Alberta Film & TV industry. Her work has been featured on CBC, PBS, UnisTV, in film festivals and concert halls across Canada. Noteworthy projects include EQUUS: STORY OF THE HORSE, FRICK I LOVE NATURE, PUSH SEASON II and SEND KELP. In addition to being an editor, Krystal is francophone, a dancer, and mama.

Sarah Taylor, CCESarah Taylor, CCE, a celebrated award-winning editor, is known for amplifying underrepresented voices through her work that has been showcased globally at TIFF, Tribeca, Sundance, Hot Docs, and the Imaginative Film Festival. Her talent spans across documentary, TV series, short and feature length films, making her a versatile force in storytelling. Beyond her editing expertise, she hosts THE EDITOR’S CUT and BRAAAINS podcasts.

Weyme TeeterWeyme [way-mee] is an award winning, freelance video editor based in Edmonton, Alberta. Her range of experience includes corporate video, documentary, indie film and broadcast television projects. Weyme has been professionally editing since 2013 and has been part of several award-winning projects including: BLIND AMBITION: THE WOP MAY STORY (EIFF 2021), and was awarded Best Editor for an episode of the APTN docu-series RODEO NATION (AMPIA 2022) and the Storyhive short film ONE, ONE THOUSAND (AMPIA 2017). With her love of storytelling and digging for the truth, Weyme brings a fresh and unique voice to each project she works on.

Colin WaughColin Waugh is an Alberta based documentary filmmaker and editor. As part of the creative team at Sticks & Stones, his work shares the stories of mountains, prairies, and the people who live there. Colin’s previous projects have received a CSC Award (2019), CCE Award (2020), 8 AMPIA Rosie Awards – including Best Documentary Over 30 Minutes (2023), and nominations at the Banff World Media Festival (2018) and Webby Awards (2018 and 2020). Beyond commercial and documentary work, Colin teaches an intro to video production course at MacEwan University.

Guy Lavoie

Guy Lavallee is a music industry survivor, TV veteran, cat lover and award-winning documentary filmmaker.   His previous films include MAKING THE TOUR, GENERATION NEXT, RIDE ANOTHER DAY, A MATTER OF PRIDE and the Edmonton Film Prize winning FAMILY EVER AFTER.  He is currently in production on a feature length passion project music doc, GODS OF RADIO.  In addition to his filmmaking pursuits, Guy is a creative producer for Bell Media, feature film programmer for CIFF, and is lead programmer for the NorthwestFest Documentary Festival, Rainbow Visions Film Festival and NorthwestFEARFest Genre Film Festival. 

Montréal: In Conversation with Amélie Labrèche

Join us for a conversation with Amélie Labrèche, a prolific editor from Montreal whose recent filmography has taken wide recognition across Quebec and the world. From feature film NOÉMIE SAYS YES(NOÉMIE DIT OUI), RICHELIEU and YOU CAN LIVE FOREVER to short films GABY’S HILLS (GABY LES COLLINS) and DEAD CAT (CHAT MORT), she stands behind some of Quebec’s most prominent emerging filmmakers who got international attention at festivals. Highly in demand in the field, her recent work on award-winning TV show BEFORE THE CRASH (AVANT LE CRASH) also expands her career landscape. Let’s go deep into the inspiring mind behind all these stories.

Amélie Labrèche Amélie Labrèche is an editor based in Montreal. She has edited 13 narrative feature films, including NADIA, BUTTERFLY by Pascal Plante, selected at the 2020 Cannes Film Festival, and various documentaries, series and short films. Recognized for her dedication to each projects, directors and producers appreciate her sensitivity, attention to detail, speed, sense of rhythm, rigour and sincere point of view allowing her to push the work to its apogee. A film buff, her desire is to deepen the creative process of editing and to contribute to profound and innovative works through the narrative and emotional power of film editing.

Xi FengXi Feng is a Chinese-Canadian film editor based in Montreal. Having lived in China, Canada and France, she has cultivated a unique blend of cultural and artistic sensitivity. Feng has worked as an assistant editor and editor on several award winning documentaries, including CHINA HEAVYWEIGHT, which premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival; and the Crystal Bear winning short film CLEBS (HOUNDS), premiered at the 2020 Berlinale Generation 14 plus section. She’s also an editor alumna of CFC 2019 and Berlinale Talents 2020.

Toronto: To Kill A Tiger: Mike Munn, CCE & Nisha Pahuja

Filmmaker Nisha Pahuja and editor Mike Munn, CCE take us through the experience of editing the multi-award-winning documentary TO KILL A TIGER. The film follows the local story of an Indian father courageously fighting for justice for his raped daughter, delving into the dynamics of a family, a small village, and the national legal system, while also addressing the broader themes of rape culture, victim blaming, and the silencing of women. Moderated by editor Nick Hector, CCE.

Mike Munn, CCEMike has edited several award-winning scripted and documentary features, including STORIES WE TELL for director Sarah Polley, BATATA for Noura Kevorkian, winner of a 2023 Peabody Award, and TO KILL A TIGER for Nisha Pahuja, winner of the 2023 Canadian Screen and DGC Awards for best feature documentary and editing. As well, TO KILL A TIGER won the 2023 Canadian Cinema Editors award for documentary.

Films edited by Mike have played at Cannes, Berlin, Venice, Telluride and Sundance, with 13 features accepted into TIFF. Sarah Polley’s STORIES WE TELL was short listed for the documentary Oscar as well as being voted in TIFF and CBC polls as one of the 10 best Canadian films of all time.

Nisha PahujaNisha Pahuja is an Emmy-nominated filmmaker based in Toronto. Her latest film, TO KILL A TIGER, had its world premiere at TIFF where it won the Amplify Voices Award for Best Canadian Feature Film. Since then, it’s won 21 awards including Best Documentary Feature, Palm Springs International Film Festival and three Canadian Screen awards. The film grew out of a long career of addressing various human rights issues, notably violence against women in India. In 2015, she won the Amnesty International media award for Canadian journalism after making a short film about the Delhi bus gang rape for Global News. Pahuja’s other past credits include the multi-award-winning THE WORLD BEFORE HER, the series DIAMOND ROAD and BOLLYWOOD BOUND.

Nick Hector, CCE, BFE (mod)Nick Hector, CCE, BFE, is a Canadian Screen, HotDocs, Canadian Cinema Editors, Directors Guild of Canada, and Gemini Award-winning documentary film editor, producer, and professor. His research explores the possibilities of constructed narrative in observational documentary and actuality drama. Nick’s work has been included in the Criterion Collection and screened at most major international festivals, including the Berlinale, Sundance, and TIFF. He is perhaps best known for his work on the feature documentaries DYING AT GRACE, FORCE OF NATURE, SHARKWATER EXTINCTION, and PREY. Nick is an Associate Professor of film production at the University of Windsor’s School of Creative Arts.

Vancouver: What are you afraid of? An exploration of horror, suspense, and tension.

What makes movies scary? Why are we compelled to watch them? How do editors influence and manipulate our experience of horror, suspense, and tension? Does editing scary films give you nightmares? Join us for a round table discussion with:

Jon Anctil, CCE (50 STATES OF FRIGHT, VAN HELSING, TWO SENTENCE HORROR STORIES)
Cindy Au Yeung (JONAH, SHADOW OF THE ROUGAROU)
Graham Kew (SATAN WANTS YOU, THE AGE OF A.I., PUNK)
Justin Li (THE TERROR, SNOWPIERCER, LUCKY HANK)
Trevor Mirosh (DAY OF THE DEAD, V FOR VENGEANCE, TRUE JUSTICE)
Nicole Ratcliffe, CCE (CREEPSHOW, TWO SENTENCE HORROR STORIES, VIRGIN RIVER)

Cindy Au YeungCindy Au Yeung is a Vancouver-based editor with over seven years of experience in both scripted and documentary content. Even though she didn’t sleep well for weeks after watching Hereditary, she does enjoy horror films and thrillers. Her recent horror-related works include an independent sci-fi thriller 

JONAH, an APTN Lumi web-series SHADOW OF THE ROUGAROU, and a short film ITSY BITSY SPIDER. Cindy’s additional projects range from producing and editing stand-up comedy shows to her own documentary projects featuring Asian-Canadian musicians. Outside of work, Cindy serves as a Board of Director at the Vancouver Post Alliance and is the co-chair of the Diversity & Inclusion committee.

Justin LiJustin is a CCE award-winning film editor based in Vancouver with a diverse portfolio in film and TV, including contributions to shows like LUCKY HANK, DIRK GENTLY’S HOLISTIC DETECTIVE AGENCY and THE TERROR all on AMC, and ANOTHER LIFE, the second season of SNOWPIERCER, and THAI CAVE RESCUE, all on Netflix. Currently immersed in the world of feature films, Justin is collaborating on the A24 project HERETIC with directing duo Scott Beck & Bryan Woods.

Jon Anctil, CCE

Jon is an award-winning editor based in Vancouver who’s found joy, creativity, and glory working across a wide range of genres and formats. A graduate of Capilano University’s School of Motion Picture Arts, Jon clawed his way up through the ranks of the editing department and has happily plopped himself in the Big Chair editing on shows like VAN HELSING, 50 STATES OF FRIGHT, TWO SENTENCE HORROR STORIES, and FAKES.  

Graham KewGraham Kew crafts compelling and emotionally-driven documentaries. Selected credits include SATAN WANTS YOU, exploring the origins of the Satanic panic; WOMEN WHO ROCK, a tribute to iconic female musicians; and PUNK,a deep dive into the history of punk culture. His work extends to AGE OF AI, discovering the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, and I AM RICHARD PRYOR, a nuanced depiction of the iconic comedian. In SOMEONE LIKE ME, he wove together the story of 11 strangers uniting to help a gay youth escape life-threatening violence in Uganda. His CV’s most unsettling horror project is THE REAL HOUSEWIVES OF VANCOUVER.

Nicole Ratcliffe, CCE
Born and raised in Vancouver, Nicole graduated from the Foundation Film Program at the Vancouver Film School in 1997 and went straight into post production as an assistant editor for a local film production company. She began Editing on the Sci Fi drama Gene Roddenberry’s ANDROMEDA and has consistently worked in scripted drama on major US and Canadian television series and MOW’s such as ENDGAME, YOU ME HER, THE BLETCHLEY CIRCLE SAN FRANCISCO, TWO SENTENCE HORROR STORIES, and most recently CREEPSHOW and season 5 of VIRGIN RIVER for Netflix.

Trevor Mirosh

Trevor Mirosh, ACE, is a Canadian born picture editor specializing in action and thriller films.  He has been creatively influenced by Thelma Schoomaker’s editing style in films like RAGING BULL and THE DEPARTED. He also has a fetish for monster-in-the-house films from watching JAWS and Jordan Peele/Guillermo del Toro films. Trevor had an auspicious start to his editing career being mentored by long-time film editor Dede Allen (BONNIE AND CLYDE, DOG DAY AFTERNOON and THE BREAKFAST CLUB). Whatever the project, Trevor relishes his role in shaping the final product.

Greg Ng, CCE (mod)Greg Ng, CCE, is a film and television editor based in Vancouver, B.C. and is a proud member of the Canadian Cinema Editors. Greg tries to maintain a balanced diet of both narrative and documentary editing, and periodically writes about himself in the third person. Some recent credits include LONGLEGS, BONES OF CROWS, and I’M JUST HERE FOR THE RIOT.

Breakout Rooms (Virtual)

What is a breakout room?

Hosted by post-production professionals these rooms offer the opportunity for participants to engage and ask questions on specific topics. Each session will run consecutively, so you won’t need to choose! You can attend them all if you want.

BARBIE: Nick Houy, ACE

Re-listen to the podcast and then join Nick in the Breakout Room to ask any questions you have about what it was like to edit BARBIE!

Nick Houy, ACENick Houy, ACE, is a film editor based in New York. Before editing BARBIE, Houy edited both of Greta Gerwig’s previous Oscar-nominated films, LITTLE WOMEN, and LADY BIRD for which he was nominated for the ACE award in 2017. Houy also won the Emmy Award in 2017 for editing the miniseries, THE NIGHT OF. He was nominated for the Independent Spirit Award for editing MID90S in 2018, and in 2022 Houy edited the critically acclaimed Netflix documentary, STUTZ.

With a little help from my agent

Tired of fighting your own battles and curious of what it is like to have an agent? Or perhaps you already have one but are wondering if you are making the most out of it? How do you find the right fit, what are the advantages, and how can you utilize the resources?

Jane MacRae and Roderick Deogrades, CCE will be here to discuss the different aspects of representation and how to build a strong relationship with your agent.

Jane MacRaeJane was 10 years old when she started her first editing gig by hooking up two VCRs to cut the commercials out of her favourite TV shows. Since then, she’s been fortunate enough to find some folks to trust her with their own projects, and she now has over 15 years’ experience in feature films and series. She has been nominated for three CCE Awards and two Canadian Screen Awards for editing, and her work has screened at festivals around the world. She loves to aim for projects across all genres, and can usually be talked into working when she should be taking time off.

Roderick Deogrades, CCERoderick is an award-winning Picture and Sound Editor who has worked in the film industry for over 25 years. His experience in feature films, TV series and documentaries has established him as one of the industry’s most sought-after collaborators.

On the picture side, he is known for his work on STILL MINE, VICTORIA DAY, and ONE WEEK. For television, he has edited THE EXPANSE, CHAPELWAITE, HIGH SCHOOL and HALO. He edited the acclaimed documentaries such as 100 FILMS & A FUNERAL, THE GHOSTS IN OUR MACHINE, DAVID & ME and SILAS.

His sound work includes SPLICE, PASSCHENDAELE and SILENT HILL.

Assistant Editing: The GAP Map

Join Assistant Editors Victoria Cho and Adam van Boxmeer as they look back on their time assisting on Netflix’s GINNY & GEORGIA Season 2. They’ll discuss their time working together and their assistant journeys since, from working with common editors on separate projects to the differences between remote and office workflows and their impacts on training assistants.

Adam van BoxmeerAdam van Boxmeer has been assisting for the last 6 years on various scripted formats from 10-minute children’s television to hour-long episodic and feature films. He began his career at Sinking Ship where he was first introduced to heavy-VFX workflows on their live action shows ODD SQUAD: MOBILE UNIT, ENDLINGS, and GHOSTWRITER. Most recently he assisted on the shows GINNY AND GEORGIA and THE LAKE which he wrapped in March 2023.

Victoria ChoVictoria Cho is an assistant film and television editor with a background in the literary arts. She blends together an easy-going spirit with a driven work ethic and thrives on collaboration and teamwork. She is dedicated to telling stories that imagine new ways of being and belonging. In 2022, she completed the DGC-Ontario Guild Apprenticeship Program as a trainee on GINNY AND GEORGIA and I WOKE UP A VAMPIRE. Her most recent credits include I HATE PEOPLE, PEOPLE HATE ME and ORPHAN BLACK: ECHOES.

Parents in post (english)

Ever wondered how parents in post juggle work and home life? How do they handle a busy workload, an even busier home life and the expectations from colleagues for timelines that don’t always align with family time! We can’t do it all, but we try our best!

Join Kathryn Dickson and Eugene Weis in our English Room and ask them how they do it.

Eugene WeisEugene Weis is an award winning film editor. His keen sense of storytelling has allowed him to craft films tackling important social issues (CATEGORY: WOMEN) as well as covering some of the most prolific pop icons in history (REVIVAL69). Eugene’s work has gone on to receive numerous awards and accolades including a nomination for a CSA (WHO THE F**K IS ARTHUR FOGEL) and two nominations from the CCE (HOWIE MANDEL: BUT ENOUGH ABOUT ME and METAMORPHOSIS). Tackling such a diverse range of films (OUR DANCE OF REVOLUTION), Eugene strives for excellence on each project he works on (DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME: THE JEFF WITTEK STORY) and is committed to bringing an unbiased approach to his storytelling (PAIN WARRIORS). Eugene most recently completed the upcoming film BAM BAM, THE SISTER NANCY STORY

Kathryn Dickson​​For more than 20 years, Kathryn has proven herself to be an industrious, creative storyteller, and post-production supervisor who has the versatility to jump from factual programming to reality, to experiential reality-docs and even old-school documentary, without losing her mind (unverified). Kathryn comes to a post-supervisory role after many years in the cutting room on almost every different kind of show you can imagine. Most recently, Kathryn has been the post-production supervisor for FULLY AND COMPLETE; The Tragically Hip doc series for Amazon Prime, and will soon be returning to her role as post-production supervisor for BIG BROTHER CANADA, one of the biggest and longest-running competition shows in Canada.

Parents in post (French)

Ever wondered how parents in post juggle work and home life? How do they handle a busy workload, an even busier home life and the expectations from colleagues for timelines that don’t always align with family time! We can’t do it all, but we try our best

Join Catherine Legault and Arthur Tarnowski, CCE, in our French Room and ask them how they do it.

Arthur Tarnowski, CCE, ACEArthur Tarnowski, ACE, CCE is a prolific, award winning editor whose work ranges from auteur cinema to popular comedies – with a penchant for action films. His feature credits both in French and in English span many genres and include; TESTAMENT, IRENA’S VOW, DRUNKEN BIRDS, BEST SELLERS, THE DECLINE, THE HUMMINGBIRD PROJECT, THE FALL OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE, THE TROTSKY, BRICK MANSIONS, DEADFALL, WHITEWASH and COMPULSIVE LIAR. His television work includes THE STICKY, 19-2, BAD BLOOD, BEING HUMAN, MOHAWK GIRLS, THE MOODYS and VIRAGE. He has also created over 150 film trailers, including some of the biggest Box-office hits in his native Quebec.

Catherine LegaultCatherine Legault is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and film editor. She graduated from Film Production at Concordia University’s Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, in Montreal. Over the past 20 years, she has worked on several films that have screened internationally in theatres, festivals, and on television. Her collaborations have included PilgrIMAGE, by Peter Wintonick and Mira Burt-Wintonick, Mort subite d’un homme-théâtre, by Jean-Claude Coulbois, Fair Sex, by Martin Laroche, Family Demolition by Patrick Damien, My Mother’s Letters, by Serge Giguère, and Rebels on Pointe and FANNY: The Right to Rock, by Bobbi Jo Hart. Recipient of two Gémeaux awards for her TV series editing work, she received the Iris award for Best Documentary Editing at the Gala Québec Cinéma for Family Demolition, in 2017. She was nominated again for My Mother’s Letters and Fanny: The Right to Rock. In 2019, Catherine directed her first feature documentary, Sisters: Dream & Variations, which was awarded at the IndieFEST Film Awards in five categories, including editing, and at the Gala Québec Cinéma for Best Documentary Original Score. Catherine is currently in post-production for her next film, LARRY (they/them), which will be released in 2024.

ART X AI: Valentine Goddard

No AI generated answers here! Join Valentine Goddard in the Breakout Room to ask all your Artificial Intelligence related questions.

Valentine GoddardA lawyer and an artist, Valentine Goddard is a member of Canada’s AI Advisory Council and a UN expert on AI policy and governance. Valentine is the Founder and Executive Director of AI Impact Alliance, an interdisciplinary organization that integrates art-based approaches to the study of the social implications of AI. She provides analyses of emerging AI regulations and policies; designs programs that link civic engagement, knowledge mobilization and policy innovation. Her curatorial best practices aim to facilitate Responsible AI. She is a Mozilla Creative Media Awardee and is leading the Art Impact AI Coalition, where close to 2,000 signatories are demanding to be at the table of generative AI regulation.

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February 9-11, 2024

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The Editors Cut

Episode 089 –  A Black Lady Sketch Show with Stephanie Filo, ACE

Episode 089 - A Black Lady Sketch Show with Stephanie Filo, ACE

Sarah Taylor, CCE sits down with Stephaine Filo, ACE to talk all things editing including her work on A BLACK LADY SKETCH SHOW, DAHMER – MONSTER: THE JEFFREY DAHMER STORY and WE GROWN NOW.

Stephanie Filo, ACE, is a 4-time Emmy winner, 7-time Emmy nominee, Peabody and ACE Eddie award winner who is celebrated for her work across film and television. Most recently, Stephanie made history as the first Picture Editor to be nominated for three editing Emmys in the same year across three different shows. Nominated for her work on Netflix’s Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story, created by Ryan Murphy; Hulu’s History of the World Part II, a sequel to Mel Brooks’ iconic original film; and Robin Thede’s groundbreaking HBO series A Black Lady Sketch Show, Stephanie’s nominations also make her the first Black editor to be nominated 3 times for Picture Editing in a single year. Stephanie has also been a part of other prior history-making Emmy wins as well. In 2020, for the news documentary Separated, she and Nzinga Blake became the first Sierra Leonean women to win an Emmy award. In 2021 she was awarded for Outstanding Picture Editing for Variety Programming, making herself and her team at the time the first all Women of Color editing team to win an Emmy. Just last year in 2022, Stephanie was awarded for her work once again, making herself and her colleagues the first all-Black editing team to win an Emmy, as well as the first all-Black editing team to win an ACE Eddie award.

Aside from editing television and film, Stephanie spends much of her spare time producing and editing social action campaigns and documentaries, primarily focused on the rights of women and girls worldwide. Some of her notable campaigns include her work with the United Nations, International Labour Organization, and the Obama White House Task Force’s It’s On Us campaign to combat campus sexual assault. Stephanie’s charitable work has been featured in Forbes Magazine, Entertainment Tonight, Telegraph UK, Yahoo, Al Jazeera, XWhy Magazine, and various others. Her work on the news documentary series Mental State earned her a news Emmy nomination for the episode “Aging Out” about youth aging out of the American foster care system. Stephanie also earned an Emmy win for her editing on the Mental State episode “Separated” which covered ICE deportations.

Stephanie serves on the board for Girls Empowerment Sierra Leone, a social impact and feminist-based organization for Sierra Leonean girls aged 11-16. She is also one of the co-founders of End Ebola Now, an organization created in 2014 to spread accurate information and awareness about the Ebola Virus and its impact through artistic community activism. Stephanie is based in Los Angeles, CA and Sierra Leone, West Africa.

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The Editor’s Cut – Episode 030 – “What is Anti-Oppression? With Tenniel Brown”

Sarah Taylor [00:00:01]

Hello and welcome to The Editor’s Cut. I’m your host Sarah Taylor. At the CCE, we began our journey of self education with Anti-Oppression training in 2019. It was invaluable for us as it provided us with tools to assess how we as an organization could set a course of action to root our unconscious and systematic bias in our operations. This training is now a permanent part of our budget so future board members and volunteers can continue this work, and equity can be part of the fabric of our organization. We are offering a Lunch and Learn Introduction To Anti Oppressive Communication with Tenniel Brown on July 27. Today I’m lucky to be able to sit down with Tenniel Brown and discuss what Anti-Oppressive training is and what we can expect from this webinar. Tenniel Brown is a passionate anti-racist anti oppression and mental health speaker dedicated to improving the experiences of marginalized people in all institutional settings. She is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication which specializes in providing anti oppressive, trauma-informed counseling, clinical supervision and organizational consulting, as well as customized workshops training and team retreats. I’m joined with Tenniel Brown, she is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication based in Toronto. And we just want to have a little conversation about why anti oppression work is important in this and all days but specifically right now. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background and why you started the Center For Anti-Oppressive Communication.

Tenniel Brown [00:01:41]

My background is as a psychotherapist. So I spent I’ve spent many many years working with individuals and couples and families and groups helping them to access more of their well-being by addressing different mental health issues specifically trauma. One of the things that I specialize in addressing is racialized trauma. But also trauma that comes from folks that have experienced different types of oppression. And I think for most people that are called to this type of work it’s quite personal for me right. So often when you don’t see the work that you know needs to happen in the community taking place you create it. And so that was me. You know I think I saw that there was a need for organizations to have somebody come in and not just talk about diversity inclusion but talk about what happens when certain identities have power and that unbalance of power and how to actually address that in our communication. I knew that out in the community there were therapists and social workers that were wanting to do better work. You know work in the best practice way with clients that are black, racialized, queer, and trans, and had nowhere to go to get supervision and support. And finally I knew personally that there were so many folks that when they were ready to do therapy work they needed to see someone sitting across the office that looked like them or had a very similar lived experience and they just were not going to come unless that was the case. So all these things I knew was happening and nobody was doing it. And I said someone’s got to do something and that was me. I think what needs to come out of what’s happened in June is for folks to see black professionals and black community in in the in sort of like the the brilliance of what we do and it’s not uncommon that in many cases where we don’t see ourselves we create it. So yeah that was the spirit of and I think that when I started the organization I knew that it was important for there to be a place where folks from those different backgrounds could come and get that support and information. So it’s a real passion of mine. It is my baby and it’s so beautiful to see folks wanting this information during this time.

Sarah Taylor [00:04:01]

Yeah so important. Can you tell us what Anti-Oppression means and what someone can expect by taking an anti oppressive workshop?

Tenniel Brown [00:04:10]

Sure absolutely. So when you sort of break down the word anti oppression anti oppressive practice we take a look at that anti part and essentially that that just means opposition to oppression and then the practice part. So AOP… the practice part pertains to the context in which you are practicing opposition to oppression. So you can apply an anti oppressive lens to just about anything. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with organizations like Pride Toronto and work with your curators to apply an anti-oppressive lens to the way they do event organizing. I have applied an anti oppressive lens to the way I do therapy and clinical supervision with other therapists. You can apply an anti oppressive lens to teaching. You can apply it to student advising, you can apply it to just about anything. I’ve been working with fitness professionals looking at applying an anti oppressive lens to the way that they support folks that are on their fitness journey. So so it’s about looking at whatever practice whatever context you are working in and using that platform to be able to oppose oppression and all of its forms. So that’s essentially what it is.

Sarah Taylor [00:05:29]

And so when someone takes courses like anti oppressive communication course or participates in your courses what can they expect to be talking about or learning?

Tenniel Brown [00:05:37]

Absolutely so I think one of the most important things is to sort of pull back a little bit of you know the cover on this because I think anti oppressive language is its own language. It’s like Spanish. And you see so many people getting themselves into some rather serious trouble these days because they actually don’t know the language they don’t understand… in some ways the harm of some of the things that they’re doing and saying the deep harm of that. You get a lot of people who don’t really know how to talk about these issues. And so you go into a shame spiral and you just don’t talk. You just get very quiet and I always argue that you know the silence piece is a part of how we got ourselves into this trouble as a human society in the first place. So what I offer is something for everybody. I think over the years what folks have said to me is is even somebody who’s maybe got a social work background and knows about anti oppressive practice when they come to one of my trainings they find that they are moved further along in their application of that perspective around “OK, well what does this mean when I’m interacting with somebody right here in a one on one context.” Other people that are completely brand new have never had the chance to learn any of this language or understand any of these concepts have said over the years that they felt like they left with a really good sense of what this topic is. But not just that practical skills. I’m all about practical skills. I want to offer things that folks can use tomorrow today and the next day and my mission is also for folks to leave his training and talk about it. Tell a friend, tell a colleague, tell a family member, and feel equipped to be able to engage in these conversations. So when someone is saying or doing something problematic, you have this confidence in the skills to be able to interpret what’s going on there and to be able to talk to them and to be able to address it. The other thing that I do is I couch everything that I do in my trainings in a self care and team care perspective. And I think this is very important. We have to look after our emotions. We have to look after ourselves and we have to look after each other. I always say you could be as anti oppressive as you want but if you haven’t had any lunch… if you haven’t eaten anything… you’re not good.

Sarah Taylor [00:07:57]

You’ve got the hangries!

Tenniel Brown [00:07:59]

Trust me, Anti-Oppressive work requires patience. It requires empathy. It requires compassion and self compassion. You will fall down a lot and I find you know and I talk a lot about cancel culture and don’t get me wrong really that could be its own podcast.

Sarah Taylor [00:08:19]

Totally. Especially in this industry.

Tenniel Brown [00:08:22]

Look we need to talk about this and I get why certain people are being canceled for sure. And yet as someone who does this work I recognize that I’m so thankful I wasn’t canceled because over the years I’ve done and said things before I knew before I took a course like this before I had an opportunity to learn what was problematic about my lens. I’m so thankful that I was able to make those mistakes in a safe environment and actually benefit from that and grow. So people get a safe environment to learn language and understand what is going on, what is oppression, if oppression is so bad why don’t we just stop this. Well I unpack that for folks. Why is this so complicated and why doesn’t this just stop. And then I provide practical skills for folks to be able to apply this to their lives and their communication. I think the other thing that I think folks get is not just sort of a general whatever, you’ll find that I’m really interested in applying it to film editors and what it is that you do on a regular basis and looking at how you can use your platform to be able to actually oppose oppression.

Sarah Taylor [00:09:31]

Yeah well it’s like it’s huge I know for myself we did anti oppression workshop as a board for the CCE. I’m in an interracial marriage and so I thought “Oh I know a lot.” Like I’ve been unpacking this stuff for a while and understanding in my own way. But also like kind of like how do I say it to my white uncle who is racist like how do I approach that. And by taking that one course, like you said I got so much more understanding of where people might come from and the language and I could approach it not by just being angry because anytime I’d hear anything I was like “You’re talking about my husband, you’re talking about my child! This is not OK!” And so it made a huge impact on me and I felt like I kind of knew some stuff but I realized that there was so much more to learn. And I think I’m still learning and it’s opened up even conversations I’ve had with my husband and my in-laws… and so I think people who are in my situation are like “no I’m cool I got I’m married to so-and-so or I have my best friend or whatever.” You grew up in your lens and there’s way more to learn and unpack.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:41]

Absolutely. Absolutely it’s so true. And I always say that absolutely positively nobody gets a pass on this.

Sarah Taylor [00:10:48]

100 percent.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:49]

At all. You know myself as someone who identifies as a black fem queer woman, you know folks would be like well you know you of course you couldn’t oppress. And it’s like yes we are all susceptible to experiencing oppression and we are all oppressors. So I have aspects of my identity that allow me to have privilege. And the thing about this is that if you’re not aware of those things that’s how you harm people that’s how you engage in micro aggressions. You know what I mean? That’s how you you know get striking up a conversation with someone about your latest renovation in your house when this person is still renting and doesn’t even have access. These are the types of things that you’re never protected from. Right. Like you’re not protected from that in a certain way. So it’s really important to remember that.

Sarah Taylor [00:11:40]

Where should someone start if they’re like feeling overwhelmed they’re like wow I know that I need to make this change. I’ve seen all this information now on social media and I’m saying all the wrong things and like you said I’m just going to be quiet which is not the right thing to do. So where do they go and what should they focus on first to just like get into this mindset of making these changes?

Tenniel Brown [00:12:02]

That’s a great question. And what I would say is education. Not a coincidence right? So of course you know joining with you know your organization to offer this to the community because I think that’s step number one. I think we do need to have good information about… you need to educate yourself. I would say that it’s a really important first step to really listen, and I find even when you have more information and you have more training it even improves the way that you can listen because what you find is when you don’t have that knowledge there’s certain things that are sort of prevent you from even being open. So I find the training and the skills and the confidence that you get from doing the course like this allows you to even listen deeper right and understand more and I think that that’s step number one. I think that once… but don’t stay there! Because I think a lot of people oh I’m listening but really it’s just their guilt and shame. So yeah they’re still not doing anything but once you’ve had the chance to listen you now can start thinking more about your platform and I think that’s one of the most important thing for your listeners to know that if it’s like well I’m not a social worker I’m not a therapist what’s this got to do with me it’s like it has everything to do with you. You have a platform as a film editor and it’s important for you to acknowledge that there are big ways and small ways that you can make a difference. And we all have a responsibility. What’s happened in this world since COVID what’s happened in this world since June is we can no longer close our eyes to this. We have to look at this and all the years that we have stayed silent on this has been what’s caused the problem. So the reality is is that we all are called to use our platform to be able to address this to look around the room and be like who isn’t here? To look around your history of the films that you and different projects you’ve been involved in and being like how many of these people, how many of these stories featured stories that were outside of what we usually see? Right. And looking at the ways that you can use your platform and your influence to be able to make a change, so we’re all called to do that I don’t care if you’re a child care worker or a housekeeper do some working at a gas station, it literally doesn’t matter we’re all a part of this human society. We all have some sort of platform and so we all have a responsibility to do something. You know Sarah one of my favorite slogans that’s come out of the protest is “Silence is Violence.” I love that one because I know what happens when people don’t have education and knowledge. They go into a shame cycle they go into a guilt cycle and they go into fear and you know what happens there? Shh. And you know what, that doesn’t help anybody at all. So I recognize that these are difficult things for us to unpack but we all have a responsibility to use whatever platform we have to make a difference. So starting by educating yourself, listening a lot, and then that’s going to help you to be more open to what you can do. And then looking at your platform whether that be personal or professional to make a change.

Sarah Taylor [00:15:20]

That was perfect. Yeah. That’s huge. And even since I took my training and even just since I’ve done my own inner work I noticed like I wouldn’t pick certain shots anymore or there’ll be things in my edit where I’m like “that’s a stereotype” or “No that’s not going to work. We can’t do that we can’t have that.” And so I think if everybody’s doing that then what we’re seeing on screen can start changing.

Tenniel Brown [00:15:45]

Absolutely. Absolutely and there’s these you know there’s there’s big ways and then there’s little ways like you describe. So it’s it is about really curating your lens, right and making sure that you’re seeing more and I think training like this just helps you to really open up your lens. So you’re not just seeing directly what’s in front of you work to the side of you but it’s more of like a panoramic view which you folks really need in the work that you do.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:09]

100 percent. Yeah. Well I hope that our membership joins us. I know we’ve already been getting people RSVPing which is very exciting. On July 27 2020 to learn and to unpack and to take part and just hopefully we can continue to do stuff with you and just keep educating and making the changes we can make.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:28]

Yeah. Join us. Join us. Don’t hesitate folks. Be a part of this. I’m really looking forward to working with everybody. And you know what we’re gonna have fun. I know these topics are really heavy but we’re gonna have some fun and we’re really going to connect with each other as a community so I look forward to meeting everybody at this training.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:46]

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me today and I look forward to seeing you on the 27th and continuing my journey. So thank you for doing this for us and thank you for sharing your knowledge and your experience with the world. So thank you so much.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:59]

You’re so welcome. Thanks for having me.

Sarah Taylor [00:17:03]

Thank you so much for joining us today. And a big thank you goes to Tenniel Brown and a special thanks to Maureen Grant and Jane MacRae. If you’d like to connect with Tenniel, you can find her on Instagram @TennielBrown. If you’d like to bring Tenniel into your organization to learn more about anti oppressive work, you can check out her website at brownconsulting.com. I look forward to learning more from Tenniel on July 27 2020 at the CCE Lunch and Learn I hope to see you there. The CCE has been supporting BIPOC TV and FILM. BIPOC TV and FILM is a grassroots organization and collective of black, indigenous, and people of colour in Canada’s TV and film industry. From writers, directors, producers, and actors, to editors, crew members, and executives. Their members are a mix of emerging, mid-level, and established industry professionals. BIPOC TV and FILM is dedicated to increasing the representation of BIPOC both in front and behind the camera. If you would like to donate to BIPOC TV and FILM please head to their website at bipoctvandfilm.com. The CCE is taking steps to build a more equitable ecosystem within our industry and we encourage our members to participate in any way they can. 

The main title sound design was created by Jane Tattersall. Additional ADR recording by Andrea Rusch. Original music provided by Chad Blain. This episode was mixed and mastered by Tony Bao. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and tell your friends to tune in. Til next time I’m your host Sarah Taylor.

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The CCE is a non-profit organization with the goal of bettering the art and science of picture editing. If you wish to become a CCE member please visit our website www.cceditors.ca. Join our great community of Canadian editors for more related info.

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Credits

A special thanks goes to

Alison Dowler

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE

Hosted and Produced by

Sarah Taylor

Main Title Sound Design by

Jane Tattersall

ADR Recording by

Andrea Rusch

Mixed and Mastered by

Tony Bao

Original Music by

Chad Blain

Sponsor Narration by

Paul Winestock

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The Editors Cut

Episode 088 – EditCon 2023: Cutting Through the Noise

Episode 88: EditCon 2023: Cutting Through the Noise

Episode 088 - EditCon 2023: Cutting Through the Noise

Today’s episode is the 'Cutting Through the Noise' panel from EditCon 2023 that took place virtually in February 2023.

The arrangement of moving pictures is referred to as cinematic language. But it is the skillful combination of picture and sound that transports the audience into a story. Strong visual and audio storytelling immerses the viewer into a world where dragons fly through the sky in HOUSE OF THE DRAGON. It makes our worst nightmares come true in the dreadful depths of the Upside Down in STRANGER THINGS. Paula Fairfield, Craig Henighan, Katie Halliday and Siân Fever share their process working on these phenomenal shows.

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The Editor’s Cut – Episode 030 – “What is Anti-Oppression? With Tenniel Brown”

Sarah Taylor [00:00:01]

Hello and welcome to The Editor’s Cut. I’m your host Sarah Taylor. At the CCE, we began our journey of self education with Anti-Oppression training in 2019. It was invaluable for us as it provided us with tools to assess how we as an organization could set a course of action to root our unconscious and systematic bias in our operations. This training is now a permanent part of our budget so future board members and volunteers can continue this work, and equity can be part of the fabric of our organization. We are offering a Lunch and Learn Introduction To Anti Oppressive Communication with Tenniel Brown on July 27. Today I’m lucky to be able to sit down with Tenniel Brown and discuss what Anti-Oppressive training is and what we can expect from this webinar. Tenniel Brown is a passionate anti-racist anti oppression and mental health speaker dedicated to improving the experiences of marginalized people in all institutional settings. She is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication which specializes in providing anti oppressive, trauma-informed counseling, clinical supervision and organizational consulting, as well as customized workshops training and team retreats. I’m joined with Tenniel Brown, she is the founder of the Centre For Anti-Oppressive Communication based in Toronto. And we just want to have a little conversation about why anti oppression work is important in this and all days but specifically right now. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background and why you started the Center For Anti-Oppressive Communication.

Tenniel Brown [00:01:41]

My background is as a psychotherapist. So I spent I’ve spent many many years working with individuals and couples and families and groups helping them to access more of their well-being by addressing different mental health issues specifically trauma. One of the things that I specialize in addressing is racialized trauma. But also trauma that comes from folks that have experienced different types of oppression. And I think for most people that are called to this type of work it’s quite personal for me right. So often when you don’t see the work that you know needs to happen in the community taking place you create it. And so that was me. You know I think I saw that there was a need for organizations to have somebody come in and not just talk about diversity inclusion but talk about what happens when certain identities have power and that unbalance of power and how to actually address that in our communication. I knew that out in the community there were therapists and social workers that were wanting to do better work. You know work in the best practice way with clients that are black, racialized, queer, and trans, and had nowhere to go to get supervision and support. And finally I knew personally that there were so many folks that when they were ready to do therapy work they needed to see someone sitting across the office that looked like them or had a very similar lived experience and they just were not going to come unless that was the case. So all these things I knew was happening and nobody was doing it. And I said someone’s got to do something and that was me. I think what needs to come out of what’s happened in June is for folks to see black professionals and black community in in the in sort of like the the brilliance of what we do and it’s not uncommon that in many cases where we don’t see ourselves we create it. So yeah that was the spirit of and I think that when I started the organization I knew that it was important for there to be a place where folks from those different backgrounds could come and get that support and information. So it’s a real passion of mine. It is my baby and it’s so beautiful to see folks wanting this information during this time.

Sarah Taylor [00:04:01]

Yeah so important. Can you tell us what Anti-Oppression means and what someone can expect by taking an anti oppressive workshop?

Tenniel Brown [00:04:10]

Sure absolutely. So when you sort of break down the word anti oppression anti oppressive practice we take a look at that anti part and essentially that that just means opposition to oppression and then the practice part. So AOP… the practice part pertains to the context in which you are practicing opposition to oppression. So you can apply an anti oppressive lens to just about anything. And I’ve had the opportunity to work with organizations like Pride Toronto and work with your curators to apply an anti-oppressive lens to the way they do event organizing. I have applied an anti oppressive lens to the way I do therapy and clinical supervision with other therapists. You can apply an anti oppressive lens to teaching. You can apply it to student advising, you can apply it to just about anything. I’ve been working with fitness professionals looking at applying an anti oppressive lens to the way that they support folks that are on their fitness journey. So so it’s about looking at whatever practice whatever context you are working in and using that platform to be able to oppose oppression and all of its forms. So that’s essentially what it is.

Sarah Taylor [00:05:29]

And so when someone takes courses like anti oppressive communication course or participates in your courses what can they expect to be talking about or learning?

Tenniel Brown [00:05:37]

Absolutely so I think one of the most important things is to sort of pull back a little bit of you know the cover on this because I think anti oppressive language is its own language. It’s like Spanish. And you see so many people getting themselves into some rather serious trouble these days because they actually don’t know the language they don’t understand… in some ways the harm of some of the things that they’re doing and saying the deep harm of that. You get a lot of people who don’t really know how to talk about these issues. And so you go into a shame spiral and you just don’t talk. You just get very quiet and I always argue that you know the silence piece is a part of how we got ourselves into this trouble as a human society in the first place. So what I offer is something for everybody. I think over the years what folks have said to me is is even somebody who’s maybe got a social work background and knows about anti oppressive practice when they come to one of my trainings they find that they are moved further along in their application of that perspective around “OK, well what does this mean when I’m interacting with somebody right here in a one on one context.” Other people that are completely brand new have never had the chance to learn any of this language or understand any of these concepts have said over the years that they felt like they left with a really good sense of what this topic is. But not just that practical skills. I’m all about practical skills. I want to offer things that folks can use tomorrow today and the next day and my mission is also for folks to leave his training and talk about it. Tell a friend, tell a colleague, tell a family member, and feel equipped to be able to engage in these conversations. So when someone is saying or doing something problematic, you have this confidence in the skills to be able to interpret what’s going on there and to be able to talk to them and to be able to address it. The other thing that I do is I couch everything that I do in my trainings in a self care and team care perspective. And I think this is very important. We have to look after our emotions. We have to look after ourselves and we have to look after each other. I always say you could be as anti oppressive as you want but if you haven’t had any lunch… if you haven’t eaten anything… you’re not good.

Sarah Taylor [00:07:57]

You’ve got the hangries!

Tenniel Brown [00:07:59]

Trust me, Anti-Oppressive work requires patience. It requires empathy. It requires compassion and self compassion. You will fall down a lot and I find you know and I talk a lot about cancel culture and don’t get me wrong really that could be its own podcast.

Sarah Taylor [00:08:19]

Totally. Especially in this industry.

Tenniel Brown [00:08:22]

Look we need to talk about this and I get why certain people are being canceled for sure. And yet as someone who does this work I recognize that I’m so thankful I wasn’t canceled because over the years I’ve done and said things before I knew before I took a course like this before I had an opportunity to learn what was problematic about my lens. I’m so thankful that I was able to make those mistakes in a safe environment and actually benefit from that and grow. So people get a safe environment to learn language and understand what is going on, what is oppression, if oppression is so bad why don’t we just stop this. Well I unpack that for folks. Why is this so complicated and why doesn’t this just stop. And then I provide practical skills for folks to be able to apply this to their lives and their communication. I think the other thing that I think folks get is not just sort of a general whatever, you’ll find that I’m really interested in applying it to film editors and what it is that you do on a regular basis and looking at how you can use your platform to be able to actually oppose oppression.

Sarah Taylor [00:09:31]

Yeah well it’s like it’s huge I know for myself we did anti oppression workshop as a board for the CCE. I’m in an interracial marriage and so I thought “Oh I know a lot.” Like I’ve been unpacking this stuff for a while and understanding in my own way. But also like kind of like how do I say it to my white uncle who is racist like how do I approach that. And by taking that one course, like you said I got so much more understanding of where people might come from and the language and I could approach it not by just being angry because anytime I’d hear anything I was like “You’re talking about my husband, you’re talking about my child! This is not OK!” And so it made a huge impact on me and I felt like I kind of knew some stuff but I realized that there was so much more to learn. And I think I’m still learning and it’s opened up even conversations I’ve had with my husband and my in-laws… and so I think people who are in my situation are like “no I’m cool I got I’m married to so-and-so or I have my best friend or whatever.” You grew up in your lens and there’s way more to learn and unpack.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:41]

Absolutely. Absolutely it’s so true. And I always say that absolutely positively nobody gets a pass on this.

Sarah Taylor [00:10:48]

100 percent.

Tenniel Brown [00:10:49]

At all. You know myself as someone who identifies as a black fem queer woman, you know folks would be like well you know you of course you couldn’t oppress. And it’s like yes we are all susceptible to experiencing oppression and we are all oppressors. So I have aspects of my identity that allow me to have privilege. And the thing about this is that if you’re not aware of those things that’s how you harm people that’s how you engage in micro aggressions. You know what I mean? That’s how you you know get striking up a conversation with someone about your latest renovation in your house when this person is still renting and doesn’t even have access. These are the types of things that you’re never protected from. Right. Like you’re not protected from that in a certain way. So it’s really important to remember that.

Sarah Taylor [00:11:40]

Where should someone start if they’re like feeling overwhelmed they’re like wow I know that I need to make this change. I’ve seen all this information now on social media and I’m saying all the wrong things and like you said I’m just going to be quiet which is not the right thing to do. So where do they go and what should they focus on first to just like get into this mindset of making these changes?

Tenniel Brown [00:12:02]

That’s a great question. And what I would say is education. Not a coincidence right? So of course you know joining with you know your organization to offer this to the community because I think that’s step number one. I think we do need to have good information about… you need to educate yourself. I would say that it’s a really important first step to really listen, and I find even when you have more information and you have more training it even improves the way that you can listen because what you find is when you don’t have that knowledge there’s certain things that are sort of prevent you from even being open. So I find the training and the skills and the confidence that you get from doing the course like this allows you to even listen deeper right and understand more and I think that that’s step number one. I think that once… but don’t stay there! Because I think a lot of people oh I’m listening but really it’s just their guilt and shame. So yeah they’re still not doing anything but once you’ve had the chance to listen you now can start thinking more about your platform and I think that’s one of the most important thing for your listeners to know that if it’s like well I’m not a social worker I’m not a therapist what’s this got to do with me it’s like it has everything to do with you. You have a platform as a film editor and it’s important for you to acknowledge that there are big ways and small ways that you can make a difference. And we all have a responsibility. What’s happened in this world since COVID what’s happened in this world since June is we can no longer close our eyes to this. We have to look at this and all the years that we have stayed silent on this has been what’s caused the problem. So the reality is is that we all are called to use our platform to be able to address this to look around the room and be like who isn’t here? To look around your history of the films that you and different projects you’ve been involved in and being like how many of these people, how many of these stories featured stories that were outside of what we usually see? Right. And looking at the ways that you can use your platform and your influence to be able to make a change, so we’re all called to do that I don’t care if you’re a child care worker or a housekeeper do some working at a gas station, it literally doesn’t matter we’re all a part of this human society. We all have some sort of platform and so we all have a responsibility to do something. You know Sarah one of my favorite slogans that’s come out of the protest is “Silence is Violence.” I love that one because I know what happens when people don’t have education and knowledge. They go into a shame cycle they go into a guilt cycle and they go into fear and you know what happens there? Shh. And you know what, that doesn’t help anybody at all. So I recognize that these are difficult things for us to unpack but we all have a responsibility to use whatever platform we have to make a difference. So starting by educating yourself, listening a lot, and then that’s going to help you to be more open to what you can do. And then looking at your platform whether that be personal or professional to make a change.

Sarah Taylor [00:15:20]

That was perfect. Yeah. That’s huge. And even since I took my training and even just since I’ve done my own inner work I noticed like I wouldn’t pick certain shots anymore or there’ll be things in my edit where I’m like “that’s a stereotype” or “No that’s not going to work. We can’t do that we can’t have that.” And so I think if everybody’s doing that then what we’re seeing on screen can start changing.

Tenniel Brown [00:15:45]

Absolutely. Absolutely and there’s these you know there’s there’s big ways and then there’s little ways like you describe. So it’s it is about really curating your lens, right and making sure that you’re seeing more and I think training like this just helps you to really open up your lens. So you’re not just seeing directly what’s in front of you work to the side of you but it’s more of like a panoramic view which you folks really need in the work that you do.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:09]

100 percent. Yeah. Well I hope that our membership joins us. I know we’ve already been getting people RSVPing which is very exciting. On July 27 2020 to learn and to unpack and to take part and just hopefully we can continue to do stuff with you and just keep educating and making the changes we can make.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:28]

Yeah. Join us. Join us. Don’t hesitate folks. Be a part of this. I’m really looking forward to working with everybody. And you know what we’re gonna have fun. I know these topics are really heavy but we’re gonna have some fun and we’re really going to connect with each other as a community so I look forward to meeting everybody at this training.

Sarah Taylor [00:16:46]

Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me today and I look forward to seeing you on the 27th and continuing my journey. So thank you for doing this for us and thank you for sharing your knowledge and your experience with the world. So thank you so much.

Tenniel Brown [00:16:59]

You’re so welcome. Thanks for having me.

Sarah Taylor [00:17:03]

Thank you so much for joining us today. And a big thank you goes to Tenniel Brown and a special thanks to Maureen Grant and Jane MacRae. If you’d like to connect with Tenniel, you can find her on Instagram @TennielBrown. If you’d like to bring Tenniel into your organization to learn more about anti oppressive work, you can check out her website at brownconsulting.com. I look forward to learning more from Tenniel on July 27 2020 at the CCE Lunch and Learn I hope to see you there. The CCE has been supporting BIPOC TV and FILM. BIPOC TV and FILM is a grassroots organization and collective of black, indigenous, and people of colour in Canada’s TV and film industry. From writers, directors, producers, and actors, to editors, crew members, and executives. Their members are a mix of emerging, mid-level, and established industry professionals. BIPOC TV and FILM is dedicated to increasing the representation of BIPOC both in front and behind the camera. If you would like to donate to BIPOC TV and FILM please head to their website at bipoctvandfilm.com. The CCE is taking steps to build a more equitable ecosystem within our industry and we encourage our members to participate in any way they can. 

The main title sound design was created by Jane Tattersall. Additional ADR recording by Andrea Rusch. Original music provided by Chad Blain. This episode was mixed and mastered by Tony Bao. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and tell your friends to tune in. Til next time I’m your host Sarah Taylor.

Outtro

The CCE is a non-profit organization with the goal of bettering the art and science of picture editing. If you wish to become a CCE member please visit our website www.cceditors.ca. Join our great community of Canadian editors for more related info.

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Credits

A special thanks goes to

Kimberlee McTaggart, CCE

Alison Dowler

Hosted and Produced by

Sarah Taylor

Main Title Sound Design by

Jane Tattersall

ADR Recording by

Andrea Rusch

Mixed and Mastered by

Tony Bao

Original Music by

Chad Blain

Sponsor Narration by

Paul Winestock

Sponsored by

DGC Alberta

Annex Pro

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